Physics

Articles from General Physics News Phys.org

Scientists introduce magnetic data storage of the future

Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) have been attracting a lot of attention recently. This is because of the increased demand for faster, longer-lasting and lower-energy IT systems, and the need for higher data storage capacity.

Muons spin tales of undiscovered particles

Scientists at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories are collaborating to test a magnetic property of the muon. Their experiment could point to the existence of physics beyond our current understanding, including undiscovered particles.

New research could literally squeeze more power out of solar cells

Physicists at the University of Warwick have today, Thursday 19th April 2018, published new research in the fournal Science today 19th April 2018 (via the Journal's First Release pages) that could literally squeeze more power out of solar cells by physically deforming each of the crystals in the semiconductors used by photovoltaic cells.

New microscope captures detailed 3-D movies of cells deep within living systems

Our window into the cellular world just got a whole lot clearer.

For nuclear weapons reduction, a way to verify without revealing

In past negotiations aimed at reducing the arsenals of the world's nuclear superpowers, chiefly the U.S. and Russia, a major sticking point has been the verification process: How do you prove that real bombs and nuclear devices—not just replicas—have been destroyed, without revealing closely held secrets about the design of those weapons?

Researchers find new way of exploring the afterglow from the Big Bang

Researchers have developed a new way to improve our knowledge of the Big Bang by measuring radiation from its afterglow, called the cosmic microwave background radiation. The new results predict the maximum bandwidth of the universe, which is the maximum speed at which any change can occur in the universe.

Researchers use diamond impurities to see on the microscopic scale

It's not often that you see 50-year-old equipment in a modern physics laboratory, let alone find it at the center of cutting-edge research. But then, most such labs aren't run by Ronald Walsworth.

Electromagnetic wizardry: Wireless power transfer enhanced by backward signal

An international research team including scientists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and ITMO University has proposed a way to increase the efficiency of wireless power transfer over long distances and tested it with numerical simulations and experiments. To achieve this, they beamed power between two antennas, one of which was excited with a back-propagating signal of specific amplitude and phase. The study is detailed in a paper published in Physical Review Letters and briefly reported in the American Physical Society journal Physics.

Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia have found a way to write and delete magnets in an alloy using a laser beam, a surprising effect. The reversibility of the process opens up new possibilities in the fields of material processing, optical technology, and data storage.

En route to the optical nuclear clock

The nucleus of thorium-229 possesses a property that is unique among all known nuclides: It should be possible to excite it with ultraviolet light. To date, little has been known about the low-energy state of the Th-229 nucleus that is responsible for this property. Together with their colleagues from Munich and Mainz, researchers at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have now performed the first-ever measurements - using optical methods - of some important properties of this nuclear state such as the shape of its charge distribution.

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