Physics

Articles from General Physics News Phys.org

Creating the largest neutrino detectors in the world

A new era in neutrino physics in the United States is underway, and UW–Madison's Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL) in Stoughton is playing a key role.

Flashes of light on the dark matter

A web that passes through infinite intergalactic spaces, a dense cosmic forest illuminated by very distant lights and a huge enigma to solve.

New model for the origin of grid cells

Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich neurobiologists present a new theory for the origin of the grid cells required for spatial orientation in the mammalian brain, which assigns a vital role to the timing of trains of signals they receive from neurons called place cells.

The first light atomic nucleus with a second face

To some degree of approximation, atomic nuclei are spherical, though distorted to a greater or lesser extent. When the nucleus is excited, its shape may change, but only for an extremely brief moment, after which it returns to its original state. A relatively permanent 'second face' of atomic nuclei has so far only been observed in the most massive elements. Recently, physicists from Poland, Italy, Japan, Belgium and Romania have for the first time registered this phenomenon in a light nucleus.

Pulses of electrons manipulate nanomagnets and store information

Magnets and magnetic phenomena underpin the vast majority of modern data storage, and the measurement scales for research focused on magnetic behaviors continue to shrink with the rest of digital technology. Skyrmions, for example, are a kind of nanomagnet, comprised of a spin-correlated ensemble of electrons acting as a topological magnet on certain microscopic surfaces. The precise properties, like spin orientation, of such nanomagnets can store information. But how might you go about moving or manipulating these nanomagnets at will to store the data you want?

Experiment finds evidence for the Majorana fermion, a particle that's its own antiparticle

In 1928, physicist Paul Dirac made the stunning prediction that every fundamental particle in the universe has an antiparticle - its identical twin but with opposite charge. When particle and antiparticle met they would be annihilated, releasing a poof of energy. Sure enough, a few years later the first antimatter particle - the electron's opposite, the positron - was discovered, and antimatter quickly became part of popular culture.

First-time 3-D imaging of internal magnetic patterns

Magnets are found in motors, in energy production and in data storage. A deeper understanding of the basic properties of magnetic materials could therefore impact our everyday technology. A study by Scientists at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI in Switzerland, the ETH Zurich and the University of Glasgow has the potential to further this understanding.

Chasing invisible particles at the ATLAS Experiment

Cosmological and astrophysical observations based on gravitational interactions indicate that the matter described by the Standard Model of particle physics constitutes only a small fraction of the entire known universe. These observations infer the existence of dark matter, which, if composed of particles, would have to be beyond the Standard Model.

Most precise measurement of proton mass

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan have made an important step toward better understanding this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they were able to improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

Researchers find path to discovering new topological materials

An international team of researchers has found a way to determine whether a crystal is a topological insulator—and to predict crystal structures and chemical compositions in which new ones can arise. The results, published July 20 in the journal Nature, show that topological insulators are much more common in nature than currently believed.

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