Physics

Articles from Science Daily Physics News

Growth under pressure: New metamaterial designed with counterintuitive property

Inspired by 3-D printing, researchers explored development of one mechanical property called effective static compressibility. As they now report, by using a single cartridge it's possible to print a metamaterial which expands in size under hydrostatic pressure, even though it's made up of material which behaves normally under hydrostatic pressure -- that is, it shrinks. In principle, there is no limit to the negative value this material's effective compressibility can take.

Clarifying the mechanism for suppressing turbulence through ion mass

Scientists have clarified through theory and simulation research that turbulence in a plasma confined in the magnetic field is suppressed and the heat and particle losses are reduced in cases with larger ion mass. This research provides a novel understanding for clarifying the 'ion mass effect' which has been a riddle since the beginning of fusion and plasma research.

From abundant hydrocarbons to rare spin liquids

Fuel such as gasoline is made up of hydrocarbons -- a family of molecules consisting entirely of carbon and hydrogen. Pigment and dye, coal and tar are made up of hydrocarbons too. These common, abundant materials, sometimes even associated with waste, are not often thought of as being electronically or magnetically interesting. But now scientists have made a significant find.

First-ever direct observation of chiral currents in quantum Hall atomic simulation

Using an atomic quantum simulator, scientists have achieved the first-ever direct observation of chiral currents in the model topological insulator, the 2-D integer quantum Hall system.

Revealing the mystery behind the formation of hollowed nanoparticles during metal oxidation

New knowledge has been gained about the behavior of metal nanoparticles when they undergo oxidation, by integrating X-ray imaging and computer modeling and simulation. This knowledge adds to our understanding of fundamental processes like oxidation and corrosion.

New discovery could aid in detecting nuclear threats

A new way to detect nuclear materials has been developed by researchers. Made of graphene and carbon nanotubes, the researchers' detector far outpaces any existing one in its ultrasensitivity to charged particles, minuscule size, low-power requirements, and low cost.

Nanoimprinted hyperlens array: Paving the way for practical super-resolution imaging

Research has demonstrated a scalable and reliable fabrication process of a large scale hyperlens device based on direct pattern transfer techniques. The research team's new cost-effective fabrication method can be used to proliferate practical far-field and real-time super-resolution imaging devices that can be widely used in optics, biology, medical science, nanotechnology, and other related interdisciplinary fields.

Quantum mechanics is complex enough, for now...

Physicists have searched for deviations from standard quantum mechanics, testing whether quantum mechanics requires a more complex set of mathematical rules. To do so a research team designed a new photonic experiment using exotic metamaterials. Their experiment supports standard quantum mechanics and allows the scientists to place bounds on alternative quantum theories. The results could help to guide theoretical work in a search for a more general version of quantum mechanics.

New quantum liquid crystals may play role in future of computers

The first 3-D quantum liquid crystals may have applications in quantum computing, report scientists. Liquid crystals fall somewhere in between a liquid and a solid: they are made up of molecules that flow around freely as if they were a liquid but are all oriented in the same direction, as in a solid. Liquid crystals can be found in nature, such as in biological cell membranes. Alternatively, they can be made artificially -- such as those found in the liquid crystal displays commonly used in watches, smartphones, televisions, and other items that have display screens.

Finding order and structure in the atomic chaos where materials meet

Materials science researchers have developed a model that can account for irregularities in how atoms arrange themselves at the so-called 'grain boundaries' -- the interface where two materials meet. By describing the packing of atoms at these interfaces, the tool can be used to help researchers determine how grain boundaries affect the properties of metal alloys and other materials.

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