Physics

Students at National Air and Space Museum to Speak with Space Station Astronaut

Students at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington will speak with a NASA astronaut living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 12:25 a.m. EDT Wednesday, Sept. 27, as part of a “STEM in 30” broadcast.

Quantum teleportation of patterns of light

Researchers have demonstrated entanglement swapping and teleportation of orbital angular momentum 'patterns' of light. This is a crucial step towards realizing a quantum repeater for high-dimensional entangled states.

Rapid imaging of granular matter

Granular systems such as gravel or powders can be found everywhere, but studying them is not easy. Researchers have now developed a method by which pictures of the inside of granular systems can be taken 10,000 times faster than before.

Researchers set time limit for ultrafast perovskite solar cells

Researchers have quantified the astonishingly high speeds at which future solar cells would have to operate in order to stretch what are presently seen as natural limits on their energy conversion efficiency.

Gravitational waves may oscillate, just like neutrinos

(Phys.org)—Using data from the first-ever gravitational waves detected last year, along with a theoretical analysis, physicists have shown that gravitational waves may oscillate between two different forms called "g" and "f"-type gravitational waves. The physicists explain that this phenomenon is analogous to the way that neutrinos oscillate between three distinct flavors—electron, muon, and tau.

Football helmet smartfoam signals potential concussions in real time, study suggests

While football-related concussions have been top of mind in recent years, people have struggled to create technology to accurately measure them in real time. Engineers have now developed and tested a nano composite smartfoam that can be placed inside a football helmet (and pads) to more accurately test the impact and power of hits.

Scientists make atoms-thick 'Post-It notes' for solar cells and circuits

A new study describes an innovative method to make stacks of semiconductors just a few atoms thick. The technique offers scientists and engineers a simple, cost-effective method to make thin, uniform layers of these materials, which could expand capabilities for devices from solar cells to cell phones.

Media Invited to View NASA Spacecraft That Will Touch Our Sun

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe will be humanity’s first-ever mission to explore the Sun’s outer atmosphere. Media are invited to see the spacecraft and learn about the mission from noon to 2 p.m. EDT Monday, Sept. 25, at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland, where the probe is being built.

Straining the memory: Prototype strain engineered materials are the future of data storage

Researchers have strain-engineered a data storage material to store data by exploiting a process of avalanche atomic switching. Memory cells using this material substantially outperform state-of-the-art phase change memory devices.

Theoretical physicist rethinks how we differentiate organisms on the microbial scale

Even Charles Darwin, the author of "The Origin of Species", had a problem with species.

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