Physics

How to See President’s Call to International Space Station on April 24

President Donald Trump, First Daughter Ivanka Trump, and NASA astronaut Kate Rubins will make a special 20-minute, Earth-to-space call at 10 a.m. EDT Monday, April 24, to personally congratulate NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson for her record-breaking stay aboard the International Space Station.

How to See President’s Call to International Space Station on April 24

President Donald Trump, First Daughter Ivanka Trump, and NASA astronaut Kate Rubins will make a special 20-minute, Earth-to-space call at 10 a.m. EDT Monday, April 24, to personally congratulate NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson for her record-breaking stay aboard the International Space Station.

Exploding Sea Cucumber Butt Threads Are a New Material

Whoever named the sea cucumber after a vegetable didn't give it enough credit. Yes, sea cucumbers are soft, warty tubes that scoot eyelessly along the seafloor. But they aren't helpless. Some secrete a poison that's deadly to other animals. And some, when threatened, shoot sticky threads out of their anuses to tangle up predators. When researchers collected these bizarre weapons and tested them in the lab, they discovered a material that's unique among sea creatures.

The threads that sea

New discovery could aid in detecting nuclear threats

A new way to detect nuclear materials has been developed by researchers. Made of graphene and carbon nanotubes, the researchers' detector far outpaces any existing one in its ultrasensitivity to charged particles, minuscule size, low-power requirements, and low cost.

Nanoimprinted hyperlens array: Paving the way for practical super-resolution imaging

Research has demonstrated a scalable and reliable fabrication process of a large scale hyperlens device based on direct pattern transfer techniques. The research team's new cost-effective fabrication method can be used to proliferate practical far-field and real-time super-resolution imaging devices that can be widely used in optics, biology, medical science, nanotechnology, and other related interdisciplinary fields.

Quantum mechanics is complex enough, for now...

Physicists have searched for deviations from standard quantum mechanics, testing whether quantum mechanics requires a more complex set of mathematical rules. To do so a research team designed a new photonic experiment using exotic metamaterials. Their experiment supports standard quantum mechanics and allows the scientists to place bounds on alternative quantum theories. The results could help to guide theoretical work in a search for a more general version of quantum mechanics.

New laser technique improves neutron yield

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from several institutions in China has developed a new way to produce neutrons that they claim improves on conventional methods by a factor of 100. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the team describes the new method and the results they obtained when testing it.

New quantum liquid crystals may play role in future of computers

The first 3-D quantum liquid crystals may have applications in quantum computing, report scientists. Liquid crystals fall somewhere in between a liquid and a solid: they are made up of molecules that flow around freely as if they were a liquid but are all oriented in the same direction, as in a solid. Liquid crystals can be found in nature, such as in biological cell membranes. Alternatively, they can be made artificially -- such as those found in the liquid crystal displays commonly used in watches, smartphones, televisions, and other items that have display screens.

Finding order and structure in the atomic chaos where materials meet

Materials science researchers have developed a model that can account for irregularities in how atoms arrange themselves at the so-called 'grain boundaries' -- the interface where two materials meet. By describing the packing of atoms at these interfaces, the tool can be used to help researchers determine how grain boundaries affect the properties of metal alloys and other materials.

Can we see a singularity, the most extreme object in the universe?

A team of scientists at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Mumbai, India, have found new ways to detect a bare or naked singularity, the most extreme object in the universe.

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