Physics

One step closer to defining dark matter, GPS satellite atomic clocks on the hunt

One professor who studies the earth and one who studies space came together in the pursuit to detect and define dark matter. They are one step closer. Using 16 years of archival data from GPS satellites that that orbit the earth, the team looked for dark matter clumps in the shape of walls or bubbles and which would extend far out beyond the GPS orbits, the solar system and beyond.

Physicists describe new dark matter detection strategy

Physicists propose a dark matter detector that would use superfluid helium to explore mass ranges for dark matter particles thousands of times smaller than current large-scale experiments.

One step closer to defining dark matter, GPS satellite atomic clocks on the hunt

One professor who studies the earth and one who studies space came together in the pursuit to detect and define dark matter. They are one step closer. Using 16 years of archival data from GPS satellites that that orbit the earth, the University of Nevada, Reno team, Andrei Derevianko and Geoff Blewitt in the College of Science, looked for dark matter clumps in the shape of walls or bubbles and which would extend far out beyond the GPS orbits, the solar system and beyond.

Metal-silicone microstructures could enable new flexible optical and electrical devices

For the first time, researchers have used a single-step, laser-based method to produce small, precise hybrid microstructures of silver and flexible silicone. This innovative laser processing technology could one day enable smart factories that use one production line to mass-produce customized devices.

New mathematical models could help solve few-body problems in physics

In physics, the conundrum known as the 'few-body problem,' how three or more interacting particles behave, has bedeviled scientists for centuries. Equations that describe the physics of few-body systems are usually unsolvable and the methods used to find solutions are unstable. There aren't many equations that can probe the wide spectrum of possible few-particle dynamics. A new family of mathematical models for mixtures of quantum particles could help light the way.

Scientists create magnetic system that transforms heat into motion

Scientists have discovered a pioneering new technique to transform ambient heat into motion in nanoscale devices - which could revolutionize future generations of data storage and sensors.

Vacuum technology makes gravitational waves detectable

You probably didn't notice the gravitational wave that propagated through the Earth in the early morning of Jan. 4, 2017, but thanks to a sophisticated use of vacuum technology, a pair of extremely sensitive laser interferometers, one in Washington State and the other in Louisiana, detected the faint rumble from two colliding black holes some 3 billion light-years away.

Why do some head knocks cause more damage than others?

Veteran sailors know that rogue waves can rise suddenly in mid-ocean to capsize even the largest vessels. Now it appears that a similar phenomenon called shear shock wave occurs in the concussed brain. It may help explain why some head knocks cause so much more harm than others.

Newest dark matter map hints at where astrophysics must go for breakthroughs

Three astrophysicists -- Scott Dodelson, Risa Wechsler and George Efstathiou -- recently participated in a roundtable discussion, hosted by The Kavli Foundation, about new data from the Dark Energy Survey and its implications for understanding the universe's history.

Lens trick doubles odds for quantum interaction

It's not easy to bounce a single particle of light off a single atom that is less than a billionth of a meter wide. However, researchers have shown they can double the odds of success, an innovation that might be useful in quantum computing and metrology.

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