Physics

Ultracold atoms used to verify 1963 prediction about 1D electrons

Atomic physicists have verified a key prediction from a 55-year-old theory about one-dimensional electronics that is increasingly relevant thanks to Silicon Valley's inexorable quest for miniaturization.

Peering into private life of atomic clusters -- using the world's tiniest test tubes

Researchers have achieved time-resolved imaging of atomic-scale dynamics and chemical transformations promoted by metal nanoclusters.

A quantum gate between atoms and photons may help in scaling up quantum computers

The quantum computers of the future will be able to perform computations that cannot be done on today's computers. These may likely include the ability to crack the encryption that is currently used for secure electronic transactions, as well as the means to efficiently solve unwieldy problems in which the number of possible solutions increases exponentially.

Quantum weirdness in 'chicken or egg' paradox

The 'chicken or egg' paradox was first proposed by philosophers in Ancient Greece to describe the problem of determining cause-and-effect. Now, a team of physicists has shown that, as far as quantum physics is concerned, the chicken and the egg can both come first.

Extremely short and specifically-shaped electron pulses for materials studies

Physicists have produced extremely short and specifically-shaped electron pulses for materials studies in the femtosecond and attosecond range.

Superradiance: Quantum effect detected in tiny diamonds

An atom gives off energy and causes many other atoms in its vicinity to emit light as well. This phenomenon is called 'superradiance'. For the first time, this phenomenon has now bean measured in a solid-state system, consisting of tiny diamonds with built-in nitrogen atoms.

Falling stars hold clue for understanding dying stars

An international team of researchers has proposed a new method to investigate the inner workings of supernovae explosions. This new method uses meteorites, and is unique in that it can determine the contribution from electron anti-neutrinos, enigmatic particles which can't be tracked through other means.

Terahertz spectroscopy enters the single-molecule regime

Researchers showed that long-wavelength terahertz (THz) spectroscopy can detect motion of single molecules, not just molecular ensembles. They used a single-molecule transistor design, where pairs of metal electrodes trap isolated C60 molecules, focus the THz beam onto them, and measure current change caused by THz-induced oscillation. Two vibrational peaks were recorded. The measurement was sensitive enough to register slight peak-splitting caused by electron charging. This could promote wider use of THz spectroscopy.

NASA Invites Media to View Spacecraft to Study the Frontier of Space

NASA is inviting media to view NASA’s Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) spacecraft Thursday, Oct. 4, ahead of its scheduled launch aboard a Northrop Grumman Pegasus XL rocket Saturday, Oct. 6, at 4 a.m. EDT from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida.

NASA Invites Media to Witness Final Orion Parachute Test in Arizona Desert

NASA is inviting media to view the final test of the Orion spacecraft’s parachute system on Wednesday, Sept. 12, at the U.S. Army’s Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona. This test is the last in a series of eight to qualify the parachutes for crewed Orion missions to the Moon and beyond.

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