Physics

X-rays capture electron 'dance'

(Phys.org)—The way electrons move within and between molecules, transferring energy as they go, plays an important role in many chemical and biological processes, such as the conversion of sunlight to energy in photosynthesis and solar cells. But the fastest steps in this energy transfer have eluded detection.

Mystery surrounding the harnessing of fusion energy unlocked

Scientists have answered the question of how the behavior of plasma -- the extremely hot gases of nuclear fusion -- can be controlled with ultra-thin lithium films on graphite walls lining thermonuclear magnetic fusion devices.

Researchers build switchable magnetic logic gate

(Phys.org)—A team of scientists from several research centers in South Korea, has succeeded in building a logic circuit that is based on switchable magnetism, rather than electronics. They describe their research and a prototype they've built in a paper they've had published in the journal Nature.

Doubt cast on late British astronomer Sir Bernard Lovell's 'brainwashing' by Soviets

A new article casts doubt on the alleged "brainwashing" of the late British astronomer Sir Bernard Lovell by the Soviets at the height of the Cold War and explains how his trips beyond the Iron Curtain laid the foundations for the easing of geopolitical tensions between the UK and the USSR.

NASA's 'Destination Station' Coming to Phoenix

The public is invited to learn more about living in space, directly from NASA experts and space-exploring astronauts, in a series of special events coming to Arizona.

NASA Hosts Workshop For Study On Applications For Large Space Optics

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center will host a national workshop for the Study on Applications for Large Space Optics (SALSO) Feb. 5-6.

NASA Hosts Workshop For Study On Applications For Large Space Optics

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center will host a national workshop for the Study on Applications for Large Space Optics (SALSO) Feb. 5-6.

Physicists find new order in quantum electronic material

Two Rutgers physics professors have proposed an explanation for a new type of order, or symmetry, in an exotic material made with uranium – a theory that may one day lead to enhanced computer displays and data storage systems and more powerful superconducting magnets for medical imaging and levitating high-speed trains.

New order found in quantum electronic material: May open door to new kinds of materials, magnets and superconductors

A new type of order, or symmetry, discovered in an exotic material made with uranium may one day lead to enhanced computer displays and data storage systems and more powerful superconducting magnets for medical imaging and levitating high-speed trains.

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