Physics

A future without fakes thanks to quantum technology

Scientists have created unique atomic-scale ID's based on the irregularities found in 2-D materials like graphene. On an atomic scale, quantum physics amplifies these irregularities, making it possible to 'fingerprint' them in simple electronic devices and optical tags.

LHCb experiment announces observation of a new particle with two heavy quarks

Today at the EPS Conference on High Energy Physics in Venice, the LHCb experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider has reported the observation of Ξcc++ (Xicc++) a new particle containing two charm quarks and one up quark. The existence of this particle from the baryon family was expected by current theories, but physicists have been looking for such baryons with two heavy quarks for many years.

Sorting complicated knots

From bow ties and shoelaces to sailing boats and climbing ropes, knots are not only very useful for our daily lives, but for mathematics too. IBS researchers from the Center for Geometry and Physics, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) reported a new mathematical operation to catalog a special kind of mathematical knots, known as Legendrian singular knots. Their study, accepted by the Journal of Symplectic Geometry, deals with knots that go well beyond the annoying entanglement of headphone wires.

A boost for permanent magnets

Scientists at TU Darmstadt explored on an atomic level how changes in iron content influence the micro-structure of samarium-cobalt based permanent magnets. Their results were published in Nature Communications. In the long run they could contribute to the development of permanent magnets with improved magnetic performance. These magnets can be found in microwave tubes, gyroscopes and satellite controls, for instance.

The LHCb experiment is charmed to announce observation of a new particle with two heavy quarks

The LHCb experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider has reported the observation of Xicc++ -- a new particle containing two charm quarks and one up quark. The existence of this particle from the baryon family was expected by current theories, but physicists have been looking for such baryons with two heavy quarks for many years. The mass of the newly identified particle is about 3621 MeV, which is almost four times heavier than the most familiar baryon, the proton, a property that arises from its doubly charmed quark content.

Energy-efficient accelerator was 50 years in the making

With the introduction of CBETA, the Cornell-Brookhaven ERL Test Accelerator, Cornell University and Brookhaven National Laboratory scientists are following up on the concept of energy-recovering particle accelerators first introduced by physicist Maury Tigner at Cornell more than 50 years ago.

Quantum sensor with improved resolution can now identify individual atoms in biomolecules

Nuclear magnetic resonance scanners, as are familiar from hospitals, are now extremely sensitive. A quantum sensor developed by a team headed by Professor Jörg Wrachtrup at the University of Stuttgart and researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, now makes it possible to use nuclear magnetic resonance scanning to even investigate the structure of individual proteins atom by atom. In the future, the method could help to diagnose diseases at an early stage by detecting the first defective proteins.

First hot plasma edge in a fusion facility demonstrated

Two major issues confronting magnetic-confinement fusion energy are enabling the walls of devices that house fusion reactions to survive bombardment by energetic particles, and improving confinement of the plasma required for the reactions. Researchers have now found that coating tokamak walls with lithium-- a light, silvery metal-- can lead to progress on both fronts.

Neutrons detect elusive Higgs amplitude mode in quantum material

Scientists have used sophisticated neutron scattering techniques to detect an elusive quantum state known as the Higgs amplitude mode in a two-dimensional material.

Recreating interstellar ions with lasers

Trihydrogen, or H3+, has been called the molecule that made the universe, where it plays a greater role in astrochemistry than any other molecule. While H3+ is astronomically abundant, no scientist understood the mechanisms that form it from organic molecules.

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