Physics

Small but powerful: Fermilab develops magnets for the future High Luminosity LHC

Magnet size is crucial to an accelerator as it determines the final circumference and power. This spring, Fermilab unveiled a 10.4 Tesla magnet that is shorter than the 8 Tesla magnets currently installed in the LHC. These new magnets will be a valuable asset to the HL-LHC, the next step of the LHC machine.

Magnetic vortex reveals key to spintronic speed limit

(Phys.org)—The evolution of digital electronics is a story of miniaturization - each generation of circuitry requires less space and energy to perform the same tasks. But even as high-speed processors move into handheld smart phones, current data storage technology has a functional limit: magnetically stored digital information becomes unstable when too tightly packed. The answer to maintaining the breath-taking pace of our ongoing computer revolution may be the denser, faster, and smarter technology of spintronics.

Magnetic vortex reveals key to spintronic speed limit

Spintronics use electron spin to write and read information. To mobilize this emerging technology, scientists must understand exactly how to manipulate spin as a carrier of computer code. Now, scientists have precisely measured a key parameter of electron interactions called non-adiabatic spin torque that is essential to the development of spintronic devices. This unprecedented precision guides the reading and writing of digital information and sets the spintronic speed limit.

Researchers set record for detecting smallest virus, opening new possibilities for early disease detection

(Phys.org)—Researchers at Polytechnic Institute of New York University (NYU-Poly) have created an ultra-sensitive biosensor capable of identifying the smallest single virus particles in solution, an advance that may revolutionize early disease detection in a point-of-care setting and shrink test result wait times from weeks to minutes.

By detecting smallest virus, researchers open possibilities for early disease detection

Researchers have created an ultra-sensitive biosensor capable of identifying the smallest single virus particles in solution, an advance that may revolutionize early disease detection in a point-of-care setting and shrink test result wait times from weeks to minutes.

Disseminating the kilogram, no strings attached

(Phys.org)—The impending redefinition of the kilogram presents a weighty dilemma. Methods to be used to realize the redefined kilogram are based on the Planck constant and the Avogadro constant respectively and realize the kilogram in vacuum. But secondary standards, as well as transfer standards for laboratory and industrial use, must be deployed in air.

Watch These Technicolor Squid Cells Dance to “Insane in the Brain” | Discoblog

Insane in the Chromatophores from Backyard Brains on Vimeo.
The folks at Backyard Brains, a DIY-neurobiology project, made these pigment-producing cells in a dead squid pulse to the base beats of Cypress Hill’s “Insane in the Brain.” Go watch that thing right now.

Low cost, high efficiency solar technology developed

Researchers have developed a new solar technology that could make solar energy more affordable, and thus speed-up its market adoption.

Curiosity Rover Plays First Song Transmitted From Another Planet

For the first time in history, a recorded song has been beamed back to Earth from another planet.

Cooled coal emissions would clean air and lower health and climate-change costs

Refrigerating coal-plant emissions would reduce levels of dangerous chemicals that pour into the air—including carbon dioxide by more than 90 percent—at a cost of 25 percent efficiency, according to a simple math-driven formula designed by a team of University of Oregon physicists.

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