Physics

On the origin of life's most crucial isotope

Since the Big Bang, the universe has been evolving. From the formations of simple protons and neutrons to the wide breadth of elements and molecules known today, it is ever growing in complexity and variety. And now, nuclear physics theorists have gained new insights into a fundamental nuclear reaction that gave rise to life as we know it.

Is it real? Physicists propose method to determine if the universe is a simulation

(Phys.org)—A common theme of science fiction movies and books is the idea that we're all living in a simulated universe—that nothing is actually real. This is no trivial pursuit: some of the greatest minds in history, from Plato, to Descartes, have pondered the possibility. Though, none were able to offer proof that such an idea is even possible. Now, a team of physicists working at the University of Bonn have come up with a possible means for providing us with the evidence we are looking for; namely, a measurable way to show that our universe is indeed simulated.

'Invisibility' could be a key to better electronics: Visual 'cloaking' technology enables more efficient transfer of electrons

A new approach that allows objects to become "invisible" has now been applied to an entirely different area: letting particles "hide" from passing electrons, which could lead to more efficient thermoelectric devices and new kinds of electronics.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/sciencedaily/matter_energy/physics/~4/VgQ... height="1" width="1"/>

Researchers simulate neutron stars' 'gigantic' magnetic fields

Scientists from the universities of Kiel and Düsseldorf (both Germany) have developed a method to simulate gigantic magnetic fields that normally occur on neutron stars only. The physicists Professor Hartmut Löwen (Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf) and Professor Michael Bonitz (Kiel University) have now published these results in the journal Physical Review Letters. In the article they show: when small particles in complex plasmas are set into rotation they behave as if they were exposed to a huge magnetic field.

NYU physicists recognized for discovering novel spin-based memory

A discovery by New York University physicists that has potential to significantly enhance computer memory has been cited by Applied Physics Letters as "one of the most notable" articles the journal has published over the past four years. The work appears in the journal's "50th Anniversary Collection," which includes the most noteworthy articles it has published over the last 50 years.

Technology developed for visual 'cloaking' applied to enable more efficient transfer of electrons

A new approach that allows objects to become "invisible" has now been applied to an entirely different area: letting particles "hide" from passing electrons, which could lead to more efficient thermoelectric devices and new kinds of electronics.

Study explains the mystery of ball lightning

(Phys.org)—Sightings of ball lightning have been made for centuries around the world – usually the size of a grapefruit and lasting up to twenty seconds – but no explanation of how it occurs has been universally accepted by science.

Quantum oscillator responds to pressure

In the future, superconducting quantum bits might serve as components of high-performance computers. Today, superconducting quantum bits are already helping scientists better understand the structure of solids, researchers report.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/sciencedaily/matter_energy/physics/~4/Cls... height="1" width="1"/>

NASA'S Operation Icebridge Resumes Flights Over Antarctica

Scientists and flight crew members with Operation IceBridge, NASA's airborne mission to study Earth's changing polar ice, are beginning another campaign over Antarctica.

NASA Signs Agreement to Develop Nasal Spray for Motion Sickness

NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston and Epiomed Therapeutics Inc. of Irvine, Calif., have signed an agreement to develop and commercialize a NASA-crafted, fast-acting nasal spray to fight motion sickness.

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