Physics

Physicists demonstrate acceleration of electrons by laser in vacuum

(Phys.org)—Accelerating a free electron with a laser has been a longtime goal of solid-state physicists. David Cline, a distinguished professor in the UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Xiaoping Ding, an assistant researcher at UCLA, have conducted research at Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York and have established that an electron beam can be accelerated by a laser in free space.

NASA Astronaut Chris Cassidy Available for Interviews Before Space Station Mission

NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy of Maine, who is making final preparations at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, for a March launch to the International Space Station, will be available for live satellite interviews from 5 to 6 a.m. CST Friday, March 8.

NASA's Van Allen Probes Reveal a New Radiation Belt Around Earth

NASA's Van Allen Probes mission has discovered a previously unknown third radiation belt around Earth, revealing the existence of unexpected structures and processes within these hazardous regions of space.

NASA Helps Takoma Park Celebrate Space Day 2013

The mayor of Takoma Park, Md., has proclaimed Saturday, March 2, "Space Day in Takoma Park." NASA's education program will be on hand to help inspire the next generation of explorers.

The Men Who Made Space Colonies Look Like Home

The sun shafts down on a group of cocktail drinkers, as a woman in a white dress laughs at something her camel-coated companion has said and a bartender stands at ease, wearing a faint smile. Behind the revelers, a rolling landscape of red roofs recedes uncannily toward a glowing ring of sky. Above, freed from gravity’s clutch, a man on a bicycle rigged with orange sails glides across the crescent horizon.
Stumble across the paintings of Rick Guidice and Don Davis in some dark corner of th

Optical materials: Light's magnetism shows its true colors

Researchers in Singapore have created tiny spheres of silicon that can strongly interact with the magnetic field of visible-wavelength light. These engineered 'magnetic materials' enable new ways of controlling light at the nanoscale.

Indecisive quanta

(Phys.org)—In ytterbium nickel phosphide there is a quantum critical point between the ferromagnetic and non-magnetic states that was previously not thought possible.

Tiny spheres of silicon can control magnetic side of light, paving way to novel optical devices

Light is an oscillating wave of electric and magnetic fields. The way the electric field component interplays with the atoms in a material largely determines how light interacts with matter. With visible light, however, the influence of the magnetic component is usually much smaller. Arseniy Kuznetsov at the A*STAR Data Storage Institute, Singapore, and co‐workers have now created tiny spheres of silicon that can strongly interact with the magnetic field of visible-wavelength light. These engineered 'magnetic materials' enable new ways of controlling light at the nanoscale.

High-speed cameras reveal the complex physics at work as air meets water and glass

When a bubble of air rising through water hits a sheet of glass, it doesn't simply stop—it squishes, rebounds, and rises again, before slowly moving to the barrier. This seemingly simple process actually involves some knotty fluid mechanics. An international research team, including researchers at the A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing, and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, has now unpicked this physical process.

New fabrication technique could provide breakthrough for solar energy systems

Scientists are using a novel fabrication process to create ultra-efficient solar energy rectennas capable of harvesting more than 70 percent of the sun's electromagnetic radiation and simultaneously converting it into usable electric power.

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