Physics

NASA Rover Prototype Set to Explore Greenland Ice Sheet

NASA's newest scientific rover is set for testing May 3 through June 8 in the highest part of Greenland.

NASA Invites Public to Send Names and Messages to Mars

NASA is inviting members of the public to submit their names and a personal message online for a DVD to be carried aboard a spacecraft that will study the Martian upper atmosphere.

NASA Spacecraft Will Visit Asteroid with New Name

An asteroid that will be explored by a NASA spacecraft has a new name, thanks to a third-grade student in North Carolina.

Success Continues as NASA's Orion Parachute Tests Get More Difficult

A test version of NASA's Orion spacecraft safely landed during a simulation of two types of parachute failures Wednesday.

Errors on Viking sun compass hint at alternative purpose

Although eleventh-century Vikings did not have magnetic compasses at their disposal, it is thought that they could determine their orientation at sea using sun-compasses. Sun-compasses use the position of the sun's shadow to tell which way north is, and look somewhat similar to sundials, which use the position of the sun's shadow to tell the time of day. But the famous Viking-era wooden fragment that inspired the idea that Vikings used sun-compasses contains some lines that don't quite match scientists' interpretations.

Watch This: Cassini Captures Saturn's Wild Polar Hurricane

The Cassini spacecraft has provided NASA with the first visible-light glimpse of a massive weather system circling Saturn’s north pole. The spinning storm is 20 times larger than the average hurricane on Earth.

Cassini detected a vortex-like weather phenomenon inside a mysterious, hexagonally shaped jet stream near Saturn’s north pole shortly after arriving at the planet in 2004, but Saturn’s winter prevented any visible light viewing. Since its equinox in 2009, however, Saturn has been r

ALPHA experiment presents first direct evidence of how atoms of antimatter interact with gravity

The atoms that make up ordinary matter fall down, so do antimatter atoms fall up? Do they experience gravity the same way as ordinary atoms, or is there such a thing as antigravity?

Graphene's high-speed seesaw

A new transistor capable of revolutionizing technologies for medical imaging and security screening has been developed by graphene researchers. The researchers report the first graphene-based transistor with bistable characteristics, which means that the device can spontaneously switch between two electronic states. Such devices are in great demand as emitters of electromagnetic waves in the high-frequency range between radar and infra-red, relevant for applications such as security systems and medical imaging.

Does antimatter fall up or down? First direct evidence of how atoms of antimatter interact with gravity

The atoms that make up ordinary matter fall down, so do antimatter atoms fall up? Do they experience gravity the same way as ordinary atoms, or is there such a thing as antigravity? Recent results, which measured the ratio of antihydrogen's unknown gravitational mass to its known inertial mass, did not settle the matter. Far from it. If an antihydrogen atom falls downward, its gravitational mass is no more than 110 times greater than its inertial mass. If it falls upward, its gravitational mass is at most 65 times greater.

Research helps to show how turbulence can occur without inertia

(Phys.org) —Anyone who has flown in an airplane knows about turbulence, or when the flow of a fluid—in this case, the flow of air over the wings—becomes chaotic and unstable. For more than a century, the field of fluid mechanics has posited that turbulence scales with inertia, and so massive things, like planes, have an easier time causing it.

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