Physics

NASA Selects Information Technology Flight Operations Support Contract

NASA has selected Science Applications International Corp. (SAIC) of McLean, Va., to provide information technology support for systems that support a wide array of flight operations across the agency.

NASA Announces Leadership Changes at Glenn and Johnson

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden announced leadership changes Friday for the agency's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland and Johnson Space Center in Houston.

Pushing boundaries of electron microscopy to unlock the potential of graphene

Electron microscopy is providing unprecedented views of the individual atoms in graphene, offering scientists a chance to unlock the material's full potential for uses from engine combustion to consumer electronics.

LLNL scientists assist in building detector to search for elusive dark matter material

(Phys.org)—Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers are making key contributions to a physics experiment that will look for one of nature's most elusive particles, "dark matter," using a tank nearly a mile underground beneath the Black Hills of South Dakota.

Searching for elusive dark matter material

Researchers are making key contributions to a physics experiment that will look for one of nature's most elusive particles, "dark matter," using a tank nearly a mile underground beneath the Black Hills of South Dakota.

Physicists skirt thermal vibration, transfer optical signal via mechanical oscillator

Using tiny radiation pressure forces, physicists converted an optical field, or signal, from one color to another, aided by a "dark mode." The conversion occurs through the coupling between light and a mechanical oscillator, without interruption by thermal mechanical vibrations.

Climate Change May Speed Up Satellites

NASA's first geosynchronous satellite.
The build-up of greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere is predicted to have a number of effects here on Earth: record high temperatures, unprecedented droughts, and stronger than normal storms. But the effects may also extend to what's far, far above us. Hydrogeologist Scott K. Johnson writes at Ars Technica that the "non-intuitive" consequences of climate change will be significant, including, potentially, screwing with the paths of satellites circling the E

Climate Change May Speed Up Satellites

NASA's first geosynchronous satellite.
The build-up of greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere is predicted to have a number of effects here on Earth: record high temperatures, unprecedented droughts, and stronger than normal storms. But the effects may also extend to what's far, far above us. Hydrogeologist Scott K. Johnson writes at Ars Technica that the "non-intuitive" consequences of climate change will be significant, including, potentially, screwing with the paths of satellites circling the E

Mathematician makes breakthrough in understanding of turbulence

(Phys.org)—A mathematician at the University of Glasgow is helping to find an answer to one of the last unsolved problems in classical mechanics.

Physicists create tractor beam for microscopic particles

(Phys.org)—New York University physicists have created a tractor beam capable of pulling particles micrometers in size. This so-called optical conveyor tractor beam, reported in the journal Physical Review Letters, has a range of potential applications, from microfluidics in the near term to far-out applications like collecting dust samples from comet tails.

Pages

Subscribe to Mr. Loyacano RSS