Physics

Accelerating neutral atoms on a table top

Conventional, as well as compact, laser-based particle acceleration schemes hinge on accelerating electric fields and are therefore ineffective for neutral atoms, which do not respond to these fields. Researchers at UPHILL lab at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (India) have generated a table-top mega-electron-volt neutral atom source. The technique involves the stripping of eight electrons per Argon atom in a cluster, accelerate the ions and subsequently put back the electrons into the ions with 100 percent conversion efficiency.

Accelerating neutral atoms on a table top

Conventional as well as compact laser-based particle acceleration schemes hinge on accelerating electric fields and are therefore ineffective for neutral atoms, which do not respond to these fields. Researchers have now generated a table-top mega-electron-volt neutral atom source. The technique involves the stripping of eight electrons per Argon atom in a cluster, accelerate the ions and subsequently put back the electrons into the ions with 100 percent conversion efficiency.

2-D electronic devices, may be possible: Fine patterns made with single-atom-thick graphene and boron nitride

Scientists have created a process to make patterns in atom-thick layers that combine a conductor -- graphene -- and an insulator -- hexagonal boron nitride. The process may lead to new possibilities for two-dimensional electronics.

Interview: CERN chief firmer on Higgs boson

The world should know with certainty by the middle of this year whether a subatomic particle discovered by scientists is a long-sought Higgs boson, the head of the world's largest atom smasher said Saturday.

Nanohybrid with remarkable properties using a new laser-plasma process

By achieving the synthesis of a novel nanohybrid structure by means of the pulsed laser ablation technique, experts have paved the way for a new generation of optoelectronic materials. The combination of carbon nanotubes and lead sulfide nanoparticles was performed using an effective and relatively simple process that offers considerable latitude for creating other nanohybrids for a variety of applications.

You don't exist in an infinite number of places, say scientists

(Phys.org)—If you've read about how modern cosmology may imply that, in an infinite universe, the existence of planets and the life forms that live on them must be repeated an infinite number of times, you may have been just a little bit skeptical. So are a couple scientists from Spain, who have posted a paper at arXiv.org criticizing the concept of the infinite repetition of histories in space, an idea closely related to the concepts of "alternate histories," "parallel universes," and the "many worlds interpretation," among others.

Evolution inspires more efficient solar cell design: Geometric pattern maximizes time light is trapped in solar cell

(Phys.org)—The sun's energy is virtually limitless, but harnessing its electricity with today's single-crystal silicon solar cells is extremely expensive—10 times pricier than coal, according to some estimates. Organic solar cells—polymer solar cells that use organic materials to absorb light and convert it into electricity—could be a solution, but current designs suffer because polymers have less-than-optimal electrical properties.

New study reveals contribution of little known Austrian physicist, Friedrich Hasenöhrl, to famous Einstein equation

Two American physicists outline the role played by Austrian physicist Friedrich Hasenöhrl in establishing the proportionality between the energy (E) of a quantity of matter with its mass (m) in a cavity filled with radiation. In a paper about to be published in EPJ H, Stephen Boughn from Haverford College in Pensylvannia and Tony Rothman from Princeton University in New Jersey argue how Hasenöhrl's work, for which he now receives little credit, may have contributed to the famous equation E=mc2.

DNA and quantum dots: All that glitters is not gold

Scientists have shown that by bringing gold nanoparticles close to the dots and using a DNA template to control the distances, the intensity of a quantum dot's fluorescence can be predictably increased or decreased. This breakthrough opens a potential path to using quantum dots as a component in better photodetectors, chemical sensors, and nanoscale lasers.

Quantum communication: Each photon counts

Ultrafast, efficient, and reliable single-photon detectors are among the most sought-after components in photonics and quantum communication, which have not yet reached maturity for practical application. Physicist have now, however, achieved a decisive breakthrough by integrating single-photon detectors with nanophotonic chips. The detector combines near-unity detection efficiency with high timing resolution and has a very low error rate.

Pages

Subscribe to Mr. Loyacano RSS