Physics

New antimatter method to provide 'a major experimental advantage'

(Phys.org)—Researchers have proposed a method for cooling trapped antihydrogen which they believe could provide 'a major experimental advantage' and help to map the mysterious properties of antimatter that have to date remained elusive.

How the kilogram has put on weight

Using a state-of-the-art Theta-probe XPS machine experts at Newcastle University, UK, have shown the original kilogram is likely to be tens of micrograms heavier than it was when the first standard was set in 1875. And they say a suntan could be the key to helping it lose weight.

From the Amazon rainforest to human body cells: Quantifying stability

The Amazon rainforest, energy grids, and cells in the human body share a troublesome property: They possess multiple stable states. When the world's largest tropical forest suddenly starts retreating in a warming climate, energy supply blacks out, or cells turn carcinogenic, complex-systems science understands this as a transition between two such states. These transitions are obviously unwanted.

New phase in reading photons

A new photodetector can cleanly discriminate among four states, not just the standard two states of binary logic.

A temperature below absolute zero: Atoms at negative absolute temperature are the hottest systems in the world

On the absolute temperature scale, which is used by physicists and is also called the Kelvin scale, it is not possible to go below zero – at least not in the sense of getting colder than zero kelvin. According to the physical meaning of temperature, the temperature of a gas is determined by the chaotic movement of its particles – the colder the gas, the slower the particles. At zero kelvin (minus 273 degrees Celsius) the particles stop moving and all disorder disappears. Thus, nothing can be colder than absolute zero on the Kelvin scale.

Magnetic shell provides unprecedented control of magnetic fields

(Phys.org)—A general property of magnetic fields is that they decay with the distance from their magnetic source. But in a new study, physicists have shown that surrounding a magnetic source with a magnetic shell can enhance the magnetic field as it moves away from the source, allowing magnetic energy to be transferred to a distant location through empty space. By reversing this technique, the scientists showed that the transferred magnetic energy can be captured by a second magnetic shell located some distance away from the first shell.

Asteroid May Become Moon for Earth's Moon

So far our galactic adventures have included landing men on the moon, taking pretty pictures of Saturn, and roaming the surface of Mars. So what's next on NASA's to-do list? Perhaps snagging an asteroid to keep in our own backyard.

Researchers from the Keck Institute for Space Studies proposed a plan [pdf] in April to bring an asteroid into the moon's orbit so astronauts can study it up close. How big an asteroid are we talking? Researchers said the sweet spot would be right around 500 to

Researchers force a gas to a temperature below absolute zero

(Phys.org)—A team of physicists in Germany have succeeded in forcing a gas to become colder than absolute zero. Using lasers and a magnetic field to manipulate an ultra-cold gas, the researchers, as they describe in their paper published in the journal Science, managed to coax the temperature of the gas to a few billionths of a Kelvin below absolute zero.

Atoms at negative absolute temperature: The hottest systems in the world

(Phys.org)—In cold regions on earth, negative temperatures on the Fahrenheit or Celsius scale can often occur in winter; in physics, however, they were so far impossible. On the absolute temperature scale that is used by physicists and also called Kelvin scale, one cannot go below zero – at least not in the sense of getting colder than zero Kelvin. According to the physical meaning of temperature, the temperature of a gas is determined by the chaotic movement of its particles – the colder the gas, the slower the particles.

Reversal of magnetic moment by an electrical voltage in a single material could lead to new low-power electronic devices

Researchers at the Advanced Science Institute at Wako, Japan, have discovered a material whose magnetic orientation can be fully switched by electric voltages. Such switchable materials have applications for magnetic data storage or novel electronic devices that use the electron's magnetic properties. As Yusuke Tokunaga from the research team explains, "Reversal of magnetization by a voltage enables ultra-low power consumption electronic devices because applying a voltage and not an electrical current means that such devices are free from Joule heating loss."

Pages

Subscribe to Mr. Loyacano RSS