Physics

Spotting the spin of the Majorana fermion under the microscope

Using a new twist on a technique for imaging atomic structures, researchers have detected a unique quantum property of the Majorana fermion, an elusive particle with the potential for use in quantum information systems.

Laser cavities take on new shapes and functionalities

Researchers have demonstrated the first laser cavity that can confine and propagate light in any shape imaginable, even pathways with sharp bends and angles. The new cavity, called a topological cavity, could enable laser components to be packed more densely on a chip, leading to higher speed optical communication technologies that can be fabricated in an efficient and scalable manner using photonic integration techniques.

NASA Pinpoints Cause of Earth’s Recent Record Carbon Dioxide Spike

A new NASA study provides space-based evidence that Earth’s tropical regions were the cause of the largest annual increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration seen in at least 2,000 years.

Team identifies universality and specificity in protein motions

Although proteins have very different function functions, or specialties, in living cells, they share the general characteristics—the same universality—in their motions, say University of Oregon scientists.

A new miniature solution for storing renewable energy

In a first for metal-organic frameworks, scientists have demonstrated their metallic conductivity.

Study shows how rough microparticles can cause big problems

New research from North Carolina State University, MIT and the University of Michigan finds that the surface texture of microparticles in a liquid suspension can cause internal friction that significantly alters the suspension's viscosity – effectively making the liquid thicker or thinner. The finding can help address problems for companies in fields from biopharmaceuticals to chemical manufacturing.

Fluctuating environments can help cooperating bacteria

Cooperating bacterial populations are more likely to survive in changing habitats, new research shows.

Scientists discover more than 600 new periodic orbits of the famous three-body problem

The famous three-body problem can be traced back to Isaac Newton in 1680s. Studies on the three-body problem led to the discovery of the so-called sensitivity dependence of initial condition (SDIC) of chaotic dynamic systems. Today, chaotic dynamics are widely regarded as the third great scientific revolution in physics in 20th century, comparable to relativity and quantum mechanics. Thus, studies on the three-body problem have very important scientific significance.

Injecting electrons jolts 2-D structure into new atomic pattern

The same electrostatic charge that can make hair stand on end and attach balloons to clothing could be an efficient way to drive atomically thin electronic memory devices of the future, according to a new study. Scientists have found a way to reversibly change the atomic structure of a 2-D material by injecting it with electrons. The process uses far less energy than current methods for changing the configuration of a material's structure.

Injecting electrons jolts 2-D structure into new atomic pattern

The same electrostatic charge that can make hair stand on end and attach balloons to clothing could be an efficient way to drive atomically thin electronic memory devices of the future, according to a new study led by researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).

Pages

Subscribe to Mr. Loyacano RSS