Physics

Chip developed by Brazil researchers will be linchpin of LHC upgrade

A Brazilian chip will be used to upgrade the detection system used in A Large Ion Collider Experiment ( ALICE), one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's most powerful particle accelerator, located on the Franco-Swiss border. The chip is called SAMPA and was designed at the University of São Paulo's Engineering School (Poli-USP) in Brazil.

Scientists make counterintuitive observations in hybrid quantum systems

A team of researchers from the National Institute of Informatics (NII) in Tokyo and NTT Basic Research Laboratories (BRL, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation) in Japan have published an explanation of how quantum systems may be able to heat up by cooling down. Their paper appeared recently in Physical Review Letters.

NASA Celebrates Earth Day with #NASA4Earth Tools, Events

This Earth Day, NASA invites you to create your own shareable views of our home planet, help combat mosquito-transmitted diseases, and watch our fleet of Earth-observing spacecraft as they circle the globe.

Simulation of the AsqJ enzyme opens up new options for pharmaceutical chemistry

Practically all biochemical processes involve enzymes that accelerate chemical reactions. A research team has now for the first time deciphered the molecular mechanism of the enzyme AsqJ. Their findings might open up new options in the production of pharmaceutically active molecules.

Understanding Mercury's magnetic tail

Theoretical physicists used simulations to explain the unusual readings collected in 2009 by the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging mission. The origin of energetic electrons detected in Mercury's magnetic tail has puzzled scientists. This new study provides a possible solution to how these energetic electrons form.

Scientists make counter-intuitive observations in hybrid quantum systems

Scientist have found that the cooling of quantum systems coupled to a common reservoir can lead to counter-intuitive behavior, where one of the quantum systems actually heats up.

New type of 'opal' formed by common seaweed

Scientists have discovered a completely new type of opal formed by a common seaweed which harnesses natural technology by self-assembling a nanostructure of oil droplets to control how light reflects from its cells to display a shimmering array of colours that until now, has only been seen in the gem stone.

New capabilities at NSLS-II set to advance materials science

By channeling the intensity of x-rays, synchrotron light sources can reveal the atomic structures of countless materials. Researchers from around the world come to the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II)—a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory—to study everything from proteins to fuel cells. NSLS-II's ultra-bright x-rays and suite of state-of-the-art characterization tools make the facility one of the most advanced synchrotron light sources in the world.

When nuclei catch up with electrons

In an attosecond study of the H2 molecule, physicists at ETH Zurich found that for light atomic nuclei, as contained in most organic and biological molecules, the correlation between electronic and nuclear motions cannot be ignored.

From insulator to conductor in a flash

A clever combination of novel technologies enables us to study promising materials for the electronics of tomorrow. Using short laser pulses, a research team have now shed light on the extremely rapid processes taking place within novel materials.

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