Physics

California Students to Link Up with NASA Astronauts on Space Station

Students from Pacoima and San Fernando, California, will have the opportunity to talk with astronauts on the International Space Station on Tuesday, May 22, as part of NASA’s Year of Education on Station.

Nanoparticles derived from tea leaves destroy lung cancer cells: Quantum dots have great potential

Nanoparticles derived from tea leaves inhibit the growth of lung cancer cells, destroying up to 80 percent of them, new research has shown. The team made the discovery while they were testing out a new method of producing a type of nanoparticle called quantum dots. These are tiny particles which measure less than 10 nanometers. A human hair is 40,000 nanometers thick.

New technique reveals 3D shape of nanostructure's polariton interaction

Researchers have found a way to reveal the 3D shape of the polariton interaction around a nanostructure. Their technique improves upon the common spectroscopic imaging technique known as scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM).

PROSPECTing for antineutrinos

The Precision Reactor Oscillation and Spectrum Experiment (PROSPECT) has completed the installation of a novel antineutrino detector that will probe the possible existence of a new form of matter.

NASA Sends New Research on Orbital ATK Mission to Space Station

Astronauts soon will have new experiments to conduct related to emergency navigation, DNA sequencing and ultra-cold atom research when the research arrives at the International Space Station following the 4:44 a.m. EDT Monday launch of an Orbital ATK Cygnus spacecraft.

UPDATE: NASA, Orbital ATK Now Targeting May 21 for Next Resupply Mission to Space Station

Orbital ATK, in conjunction with NASA, has moved the launch of its ninth contracted mission to the International Space Station to no earlier than 4:39 a.m. EDT Monday, May 21, to support further prelaunch inspections and more favorable weather conditions.

Diamond 'spin-off' tech could lead to low-cost medical imaging and drug discovery tools

It may sound contradictory, but diamonds are the key to a new technique that could provide a very-low-cost alternative to multimillion-dollar medical imaging and drug-discovery devices.

Diamond 'spin-off' tech could lead to low-cost medical imaging and drug discovery tools

An international team has discovered how to exploit defects in nanoscale and microscale diamonds and potentially enhance the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance systems while eliminating the need for their costly and bulky superconducting magnets.

Magnonic interferometer paves way toward energy-efficient information processing devices

Researchers have designed an interferometer that works with magnetic quasiparticles called magnons, rather than photons as in conventional interferometers. Although magnon signals have discrete phases that normally cannot be changed continuously, the magnonic interferometer can generate a continuous change of the magnon signal. In the future, this ability could be used to design magnonic integrated circuits and other magnonic devices that overcome some of the limitations facing their electronic counterparts.

Can a quantum drum vibrate and stand still at the same time?

Researchers have studied how a 'drumstick' made of light could make a microscopic 'drum' vibrate and stand still at the same time.

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