Physics

Faster, cheaper, nano-based manufacturing

Engineers are developing a new method of processing nanomaterials that could lead to faster and cheaper manufacturing of flexible thin film devices -- from touch screens to window coatings, according to a new study. The 'intense pulsed light sintering' method uses high-energy light over an area nearly 7,000 times larger than a laser to fuse nanomaterials in seconds.

New turbulent transport modeling shows multiscale fluctuations in heated plasma

Researchers used a 'reduced physics' fluid model of plasma turbulence to explain unexpected properties of the density profile inside a tokamak experiment. Modeling plasma's turbulent behavior could help scientists optimize the tokamak performance in future fusion reactors like ITER.

Missing link to novel superconductivity revealed

Scientists have discovered a state of magnetism that may be the missing link to understanding the relationship between magnetism and unconventional superconductivity.

Texas Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut on Space Station

Students from Highland Village, Texas, will speak with a NASA astronaut living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 1:10 p.m. EST Wednesday, Feb. 14.

Texas Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut on Space Station

Students from Highland Village, Texas, will speak with a NASA astronaut living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 1:10 p.m. EST Wednesday, Feb. 14.

Three's company: New alloy sets magnetism benchmark

Spintronics leverages electron spins to enhance solid-state devices by prolonging battery life. Spintronic developments, however, are increasingly running up against the Slater-Pauling limit, the maximum for how tightly a material can pack its magnetization. Now, a new thin film is poised to break through this decades-old benchmark. Researchers now discuss their work constructing a stable thin film made from iron, cobalt and manganese that may push past the Slater-Pauling limit.

Three's company: New alloy sets magnetism benchmark

The burgeoning field of spintronics leverages electron spins—as opposed to their charge—to enhance solid-state devices like hard drives and cell phone components by prolonging battery life. Spintronic developments, however, are increasingly running up against a barrier known as the Slater-Pauling limit, the maximum for how tightly a material can pack its magnetization. Now, a new thin film is poised to break through this decades-old benchmark.

Breaking local symmetry: Why water freezes but silica forms a glass

Researchers have simulated water and silica at low temperature. Despite structural similarities, the two liquids act differently when they are cooled: water freezes into ice, while silica continues to supercool, and eventually forms a glass. This arises from poor symmetry-breaking in silica; although atoms arrange properly in the first shell in both liquids, local rotational symmetry is harder to break in the second shell in silica, because of the less directional Si-O bonds.

Texas Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut on Space Station

Students from Highland Village, Texas, will speak with a NASA astronaut living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 1:10 p.m. EST Wednesday, Feb. 14. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Tricking photons leads to first-of-its-kind laser breakthrough

A team of optics researchers has demonstrated the first-ever nonmagnetic topological insulator laser, a finding that has the potential to substantially improve the efficiency, beam quality, and resilience of semiconductor laser arrays.

Pages

Subscribe to Mr. Loyacano RSS