Physics

Ionic decision-maker capable of self-learning

A NIMS research group has invented an ionic device, termed an ionic decision-maker, capable of quickly making its own decisions based on previous experience using changes in ionic/molecular concentrations. The group then succeeded in demonstrating its operation. This device is capable of making decisions while efficiently adapting to changing situations by a means unrelated to the storage of past experiences in computer memory or to the performance of decision-making computations.

Using puffed rice to simulate collapsing ice shelves and rockfill dams

A pair of researchers at the University of Sydney has found that puffed rice and milk can serve as a stand-in to simulate collapsing ice shelves and rockfill dams. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, Itai Einav and François Guillard discuss their experiments with rice and milk in their lab and what they believe it showed them about real-world collapse events.

Scientists achieve first ever acceleration of electrons in plasma waves

Researchers have demonstrated a new technique for accelerating electrons to very high energies over short distances.

What "First Man" Gets Fabulously Right About NASA: An Interview with Apollo 15 Astronaut Al Worden

First Man is not like other movies about the space race, and I mean that in a very good way.

I’ll admit, I was skeptical about the director of La La Land telling the story of Neil Armstrong’s historic landing on the Moon. (Would there be songs? A scowling J.K. Simmons?) It turns out to be a synergistic pairing of artist and material. First Man brushes aside the expected saga of space cowboys saddling up their steel horses, delivering instead a moving narrative of NASA’s glory days as seen

NASA Administrator Statement on Deputy Administrator Confirmation

Statement from NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine about the Senate confirmation of James Morhard as the agency’s deputy administrator

Missouri, Colorado Students to Speak with Astronaut on Space Station

Elementary school students from Missouri and Colorado will talk live with an astronaut on the International Space Station next week.

Missouri, Colorado Students to Speak with Astronaut on Space Station

Elementary school students from Missouri and Colorado will talk live with an astronaut on the International Space Station next week.

Disrupting crystalline order to restore superfluidity

What if you could disrupt the crystalline order of quantum matter so that the superfluid could flow freely even at temperatures and pressures where it usually does not? This is indeed the idea that was demonstrated by a team of scientists led by Ludwig Mathey and Andreas Hemmerich from the University of Hamburg.

Researchers model how toxic proteins course through the brain, lead to disease

Many neurodegenerative diseases spread by hijacking the brain's connective circuitry to transport toxic proteins, which gradually accumulate and trigger symptoms of dementias. Now, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology and colleagues have modeled how these toxic proteins spread throughout the brain to reproduce the telltale patterns of atrophy associated with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS.

Researchers discuss the probability of finding a gluon inside the pion

Researchers from NC State University have determined the probability of finding a gluon inside the pion. The Abstract sat down with graduate student and lead author Patrick Barry and his research advisor Chueng Ji, professor of physics at NC State, to talk about what this finding means for our understanding of how the universe works.

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