Physics

Computing the physics that links nuclear structure, element formation, and the life and death of stars

The Big Bang began the formation and organization of the matter that makes up ourselves and our world. Nearly 14 billion years later, nuclear physicists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and their partners are using America's most powerful supercomputers to characterize the behavior of objects, from subatomic neutrons to neutron stars, that differ dramatically in size yet are closely connected by physics.

Physicists, engineers to build next-generation MRI brain scanner

Functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI, has transformed our view of the brain, allowing researchers to pinpoint areas associated with everything from depression and dementia to playing chess and engaging in sex.

Media Accreditation Opens for Launch of NOAA’s JPSS-1 Satellite

The Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1), the first in a new series of four highly advanced National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) polar-orbiting satellites, which will help increase weather forecast accuracy from three to seven days out, is scheduled to launch on Friday, Nov. 10 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.

NASA Offers Access to Cygnus Spacecraft Ahead of Next Space Station Mission

Media are invited to view and photograph Orbital ATK’s Cygnus spacecraft, packed with cargo and scientific experiments for its upcoming flight to the International Space Station, at 10:30 a.m. EDT Wednesday, Oct. 18, at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia.

Asymmetric sound absorption lets in the light

If you've ever lived in an apartment building or stayed in a hotel room, you are probably familiar with the inconvenience of inadequate sound absorption. Acoustic absorption refers to the absorption of sound energy by a material. Whether it's to improve acoustics or to prevent noisy neighbors, sound absorption has multiple applications in engineering and architecture, which can be improved by asymmetric acoustics.

Connecting the Dots

Nuclear physicists are using America’s most powerful supercomputers to characterize behavior of objects, from subatomic neutrons to neutron stars, that differ dramatically in size yet are closely connected by physics.

Energy against the current on a quantum scale, without contradicting the laws of physics

In a classical thermodynamic system, the heat current flows from the hotter body to the colder one, or electricity from the higher voltage to the lower one. The same thing happens in quantum systems, but this state can be changed, and the flow of energy and particles can be reversed if a quantum observer is inserted into the system.

Exotic quantum particle observed in bilayer graphene

Physicists have definitively observed an intensely studied anomaly in condensed matter physics -- the even-denominator fractional quantum Hall state -- via transport measurement in bilayer graphene.

Electron behaviour under extreme conditions described for the first time

Researchers have modeled the actions of electrons under extreme temperatures and densities, such as those found within planets and stars.

Shrinking the proton: Researchers confirm the small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly smaller, by four standard deviations, than previous determinations using regular hydrogen. This discrepancy and its origin have attracted much attention in the scientific community, with implications for the so-called Standard Model of physics.

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