Physics

NASA Awards Contract for Modification of Mobile Launcher

NASA has awarded a contract to RS&H, Inc. of Merritt Island, Florida, for architectural engineering and design services for the modification of the mobile launcher at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

NASA Awards Acquisition, Business Support Services Contract

NASA has awarded a contract to Paragon TEC, Inc. of Cleveland to provide acquisition and business support services at the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, and its Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans.

New SQUID-based detector opens up new fields of study with new level of sensitivity

Investigators at the University of Colorado, Boulder and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a new sensor array-based instrument that offers ultra-low noise detection of small amounts of energy for a number of applications. The new device allows for the collection of data from many more detectors than was previously possible. The advance, reported in this week's issue of Applied Physics Letters, is expected to allow applications in fields as diverse as nuclear materials accounting, astrophysics and X-ray spectrometry.

Space-based experiment will tackle the mysteries of cosmic rays

On August 14, 2017, a groundbreaking University of Maryland-designed cosmic ray detector will travel to the International Space Station (ISS) aboard the SpaceX-12 Commercial Resupply Service mission. The instrument, named ISS Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (ISS-CREAM), is roughly the size of a refrigerator and will remain installed on the ISS's Japanese Experiment Module for at least three years. The massive amounts of data ISS-CREAM will collect could reveal new details about the origin and diversity of cosmic rays.

NASA Television to Air Six-Hour Spacewalk at International Space Station

Two Russian cosmonauts will venture outside the International Space Station Thursday, Aug. 17, to deploy several nanosatellites, collect research samples and perform structural maintenance.

Massive particles test standard quantum theory

In quantum mechanics particles can behave as waves and take many paths through an experiment. It requires only combinations of pairs of paths, rather than three or more, to determine the probability for a particle to arrive somewhere. Researchers have addressed this question for the first time explicitly using the wave interference of large molecules behind various combinations of single, double, and triple slits.

A new tool for multilayer networks

Sophisticated network analysis means finding relationships that often aren't easy to see. A network may have many layers—corresponding to different types of relationships in a social network, for example—but traditional approaches to analysis are limited. They tend to flatten networks into single layers, or treat layers independently of the others.

New devices to control X-rays are less expensive, faster to make

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have developed a less expensive and more efficient way of controlling x-ray beams used to study the intricate details of batteries, solar cells, proteins and all manner of materials. The new beam-shaping devices, invented by Brookhaven mechanical engineer Sushil Sharma, can be made from a single piece of copper, which dramatically reduces the time and complexity of their construction – and their cost.

Shock front probed by protons

A shock front is usually considered as a simple discontinuity in density or pressure. Yet in strongly shocked gases, the atoms are ionized into electrons and ions. The large difference in the electron pressure across the shock front can generate a strong electric field.

Researchers develop innovative way to understand nature of an entire tiny particle

New research from the University of New Hampshire has led to the development of a novel technique to determine the surface area and volume of small particles, the size of a grain of sand or smaller. Due to their tiny size, irregular shape and limited viewing angle, commonly used microscopic imaging techniques cannot always capture the whole object's shape often leaving out valuable information that can be important in numerous areas of science, engineering and medicine.

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