Physics

Rules for superconductivity mirrored in 'excitonic insulator'

Physicists dedicated to creating the working components of a fault-tolerant quantum computer have succeeded in creating an 'excitonic insulator,' a previously unseen state of matter that could be useful for encoding information in a topological quantum computer.

Solar power advances possible with new 'double-glazing' device

A new 'double-glazing' solar power device -- which is unlike any existing solar panel and opens up fresh opportunities to develop more advanced photovoltaics -- has been invented.

The Moon Shines Brightly Among NASA’s 2017 Highlights

The Moon became a key focus point for NASA in 2017, whether it was blocking out the Sun during one of the most-viewed events in U.S. history, or reinvigorating the agency’s human space exploration plans.

The molecular structure of a forest aroma deconstructed

The fresh, unmistakable scent of a pine forest comes from a medley of chemicals produced by its trees. Researchers have now accurately determined the chemical structure of one compound in its gas phase, a molecule called alpha-pinene. The analysis can help scientists better detect and understand how alpha-pinene reacts with other gases in the atmosphere, a process that can affect health and climate.

Old rules apply in explaining extremely large magnetoresistance

Physicists compared similar materials and returned to a long-established rule of electron movement in their quest to explain the phenomenon of extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR).

Old rules apply in explaining extremely large magnetoresistance

Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory compared similar materials and returned to a long-established rule of electron movement in their quest to explain the phenomenon of extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR), in which the application of a magnetic field to a material results in a remarkably large change in electrical resistance. It is a useful property, which could be used in the development of computers with increased processor speeds and data storage.

How does it look when Earth is bombarded with dark matter?

University of Southern Denmark researchers have conducted simulations of dark matter particles hitting the Earth. Physicists believe that Earth collides with uncountable dark matter particles as it hurtles through space. Although no one has ever seen these mysterious particles, there is no question among physicists about their existence. Researchers have installed detectors around the globe in the hope of detecting them.

Physicists propose a new method for monitoring nuclear waste

New scientific findings suggest neutrino detectors may play an important role in ensuring better monitoring and safer storage of radioactive material in nuclear waste repository sites. Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany have made calculations to ascertain the neutrino radiation that spent nuclear fuel emits. Their figures show that neutrino detectors could be useful in certain scenarios.

Controlling spin for memory storage

Tohoku University researchers have developed a computational simulation that shows that using ultrafast laser pulses to excite electrons in a magnetic material switches them into a transient non-magnetic state. This could reduce the time involved in manipulating a material's magnetism, improving magnetic storage and information processing technologies.

Scientists craft world's tiniest interlinking chains

For decades, scientists have been trying to make a true molecular chain: a repeated set of tiny rings interlocked together. Researchers have announced and confirmed a method to craft such a molecular chain.

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