Physics

Super sensitive devices work on recycling atoms

Next-generation sensors to be used in fields as diverse as mineral exploration and climate change will be turbo boosted thanks to new research. Theoretical physicists said future precision sensing technology would exploit unusual effects of quantum mechanics.

Potential new applications stem from controlling particles' spin configurations

Fermions are ubiquitous elementary particles. They span from electrons in metals, to protons and neutrons in nuclei and to quarks at the sub-nuclear level. Further, they possess an intrinsic degree of freedom called spin with only two possible configurations, either up or down. In a new study published in EPJ B, theoretical physicists explore the possibility of separately controlling the up and down spin populations of a group of interacting fermions.

NASA Television to Air Launch of NASA Astronaut Jack Fischer, Crewmate

NASA astronaut Jack Fischer is poised for a journey of exploration and research on the International Space Station. Extensive coverage of upcoming prelaunch activities, launch and arrival will air on NASA Television and streamed on the agency’s website.

Foldable silicon-based electronics overcome fragility problem

(Phys.org)—Researchers have developed a method for fabricating silicon-based electronics that can be stretched and folded without damage, circumventing the problem of extreme fragility that ultra-thin flexible silicon materials traditionally face.

Unveiling nonlocal correlations in natural systems

Nonlocal correlations are a quantum phenomenon that constitute a stronger form of correlations than quantum entanglement, new research shows. Now researchers have developed a new method to show that the low energy states of some physical spin Hamiltonians can exhibit these nonlocal correlations.

New sensor devices recycle atoms

Next-generation sensors to be used in fields as diverse as mineral exploration and climate change will be turbo boosted thanks to University of Queensland and University of Sussex research.

Shoe-string theory: Science shows why shoelaces come untied

A new study by mechanical engineers at UC Berkeley finally shows why your shoelaces may keep coming untied. It's a question that everyone asks, often after stopping to retie their shoes, yet one that nobody had investigated until now. The answer, the study suggests, is that a double whammy of stomping and whipping forces acts like an invisible hand, loosening the knot and then tugging on the free ends of your laces until the whole thing unravels.

NASA TV to Air Orbital ATK Resupply Mission Launch, Briefings

NASA commercial cargo provider Orbital ATK is targeting its seventh commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station for 11:11 a.m. EDT Tuesday, April 18. Coverage of the launch begins at 10 a.m. on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Physicists discover hidden aspects of electrodynamics

Radio waves, microwaves and even light itself are all made of electric and magnetic fields. The classical theory of electromagnetism was completed in the 1860s by James Clerk Maxwell. At the time, Maxwell's theory was revolutionary, and provided a unified framework to understand electricity, magnetism and optics. Now, new research led by LSU Department of Physics & Astronomy Assistant Professor Ivan Agullo, with colleagues from the Universidad de Valencia, Spain, advances knowledge of this theory. Their recent discoveries have been published in Physical Review Letters.

Research group works toward devising topological superconductor

A new topological superconductor made from an ultrathin transition metal dichalcogenide is a step toward quantum computing, suggests a new research report.

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