Physics

NASA Television to Air Launch of Global Ice-Measuring Satellite

NASA’s Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2), a mission to measure the changing height of Earth's ice, is scheduled to launch Saturday, Sept. 15, with a 40-minute window opening at 8:46 a.m. EDT (5:46 a.m. PDT).

High precision microbial population dynamics under cycles of feast and famine

Scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have produced the most precise picture to date of population dynamics in fluctuating feast-or-famine conditions. Professor Seppe Kuehn, a biological physicist, and his graduate student Jason Merritt found that bacterial population density is a function of both the frequency and the amplitude of nutrient fluctuations. They found that the more frequent the feast cycles and the longer a feast cycle, the more rapid the population recovery from a famine state.

Ultracold atoms used to verify 1963 prediction about 1-D electrons

Rice University atomic physicists have verified a key prediction from a 55-year-old theory about one-dimensional electronics that is increasingly relevant thanks to Silicon Valley's inexorable quest for miniaturization.

Think pink for a better view of climate change

A new study says pink noise may be the key to separating out natural climate variability from climate change that is influenced by human activity.

Ultracold atoms used to verify 1963 prediction about 1D electrons

Atomic physicists have verified a key prediction from a 55-year-old theory about one-dimensional electronics that is increasingly relevant thanks to Silicon Valley's inexorable quest for miniaturization.

Peering into private life of atomic clusters -- using the world's tiniest test tubes

Researchers have achieved time-resolved imaging of atomic-scale dynamics and chemical transformations promoted by metal nanoclusters.

A quantum gate between atoms and photons may help in scaling up quantum computers

The quantum computers of the future will be able to perform computations that cannot be done on today's computers. These may likely include the ability to crack the encryption that is currently used for secure electronic transactions, as well as the means to efficiently solve unwieldy problems in which the number of possible solutions increases exponentially.

Quantum weirdness in 'chicken or egg' paradox

The 'chicken or egg' paradox was first proposed by philosophers in Ancient Greece to describe the problem of determining cause-and-effect. Now, a team of physicists has shown that, as far as quantum physics is concerned, the chicken and the egg can both come first.

Extremely short and specifically-shaped electron pulses for materials studies

Physicists have produced extremely short and specifically-shaped electron pulses for materials studies in the femtosecond and attosecond range.

Superradiance: Quantum effect detected in tiny diamonds

An atom gives off energy and causes many other atoms in its vicinity to emit light as well. This phenomenon is called 'superradiance'. For the first time, this phenomenon has now bean measured in a solid-state system, consisting of tiny diamonds with built-in nitrogen atoms.

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