Physics

Algorithms extract biological structure from limited data

A new algorithmic framework called multi-tiered iterative phasing (M-TIP) utilizes advanced mathematical techniques to determine 3-D molecular structure of important nanoobjects like proteins and viruses from very sparse sets of noisy, single-particle data.

New algorithms extract biological structure from limited data

Understanding the 3D molecular structure of important nanoobjects like proteins and viruses is crucial in biology and medicine. With recent advances in X-ray technology, scientists can now collect diffraction images from individual particles, ultimately allowing researchers to visualize molecules at room temperature.

ATLAS experiment takes its first glimpse of the Higgs boson in its favourite decay

Previously, the Higgs boson has been observed decaying to photons, tau-leptons, and W and Z bosons. However, these impressive achievements represent only 30 percent of Higgs boson decays. The Higgs boson's favoured decay to a pair of b-quarks (H→bb) was predicted to happen around 58 percent of the time, thus driving the short lifetime of the Higgs boson, and thus remained elusive.

Spontaneous system follows rules of equilibrium

Scientists have long known the ins and outs of equilibrium thermodynamics. Systems in equilibrium—a stable state of unchanging balance—are governed by a neat set of rules, making them predictable and easy to explore.

Spontaneous system follows rules of equilibrium

A new discovery could be the beginning of a general framework of rules for seemingly unpredictable non-equilibrium systems, explain researchers.

Harnessing hopping hydrogens for high-efficiency OLEDs

A novel design strategy has been revealed for efficient light-emitting molecules with applications in next-generation displays and lighting through renewed investigation of a molecule that slightly changes its chemical structure before and after emission.

Breakthrough in spintronics

It's ultra-thin, electrically conducting at the edge and highly insulating within – and all that at room temperature. Physicists have developed a promising new material.

SLAC's electron hub gets new 'metro map' for world's most powerful X-ray laser

The central hub for powerful electron beams at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is getting a makeover to prepare for the installation of LCLS-II – a major upgrade to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world's first hard X-ray free-electron laser. LCLS-II will deliver the most powerful X-rays ever made in a lab, with beams that are 10,000 times brighter than before, opening up unprecedented research opportunities in chemistry, materials science, biology and energy research.

Technique could lead to significantly higher power proton beams used to answer tough scientific questions

Many large-scale accelerators deliver short, powerful pulses of proton beams. Creating the beams involves accumulating multiple lower power beam pulses to produce a single high-power beam pulse. Today, the achievable proton beam powers are limited by the technology used to merge the incoming pulses into a final beam pulse. To resolve this limitation, scientists demonstrated a new technique, called laser stripping. The approach uses a high-power laser and two magnets.

Breakthrough in spintronics

It's ultra-thin, electrically conducting at the edge and highly insulating within—and all that at room temperature: Physicists from the University of Würzburg have developed a promising new material.

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