Physics

Research reveals exotic quantum states in double-layer graphene

Researchers have demonstrated previously unknown states of matter that arise in double-layer stacks of graphene, a two-dimensional nanomaterial. These new states, known as the fractional quantum Hall effect, arise from the complex interactions of electrons both within and across graphene layers.

Data visualization could reveal nature of the universe

As cosmologists ponder the universe—and other possible universes—the data available to them is so complex and vast that it can be extremely challenging for humans alone to comprehend.

Helping physics teachers who don't know physics

A shortage of high school physics teachers has led to teachers with little-to-no training taking over physics classrooms, reports show. This has led to additional stress and job dissatisfaction for those teachers -- and a difficult learning experience for their students. But new research indicates that focused physics professional development for teachers -- even those who have no prior physics training -- can lead to better experiences for both students and teachers, and can improve students' understanding of physics concepts.

Machine learning reveals how strongly interacting electrons behave at atomic level

A team of scientists collaborating across theoretical and experimental physics and computer science, have developed and trained a new Machine Learning (ML) technique, to finally understand how electrons behave in important quantum materials.

Finding missing network links could help develop new drugs, stop disease, ease traffic

A new mathematical model of the structure of networks could help find new cancer drugs, speed up traffic flow and combat sexually transmitted disease.

A further step towards reliable quantum computation

A team of physicists introduces a novel technique to detect entanglement even in large-scale quantum systems with unprecedented efficiency. This brings scientists one step closer to the implementation of reliable quantum computation. The new results are of direct relevance for future generations of quantum devices.

Researcher shows physics suggests life could exist in a 2-D universe

James Scargill, a physicist at the University of California, has written a paper reporting that the laws of physics allow for the existence of a life-supporting two-dimensional universe. MIT's Technology Review has reviewed the paper and found that the work does show that such a 2+1 universe could exist.

Boosting light-based computing

University of Twente spinoff company QuiX is currently developing a photonic chip using the quantum properties of light for carrying out complex calculations. The new chip, of which a first version is already operational, calculates using light, photons, and will be an attractive platform for discovering the potential of quantum computing and for experimenting with new ways of calculating. Further development of the photonics processor will be made possible through an investment by Oost NL, University of Twente and some informal investors.

Physicists develop new method to prove quantum entanglement

One of the essential features required for the realization of a quantum computer is quantum entanglement. A team of physicists from the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences (ÖAW) introduces a novel technique to detect entanglement even in large-scale quantum systems with unprecedented efficiency. This brings scientists one step closer to the implementation of reliable quantum computation. The new results are of direct relevance for future generations of quantum devices and are published in the current issue of the journal Nature Physics.

Applying the Goldilocks principle to DNA structure

The Goldilocks of fairy-tale fame knew something about porridge. It needed to be just right—neither too hot nor too cold. Same with furniture—neither too hard nor too soft. In a different context, scientists at UC San Diego know something about DNA. They know that the strands of our genetic code, if extended, would measure two meters, or about six feet. They also know that the strands fold into and move within the cell nucleus the size of about a hundredth of a millimeter. But they don't know how and in what state of matter this occurs, so they decided to check.

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