Physics

Using fluid dynamics to perfect crêpe cooking techniques

A pair of fluid dynamics physicists, one with Ecole Polytechnique, the other the University of Canterbury, have used their respective backgrounds to develop the optimal way to fry a crêpe. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Fluids, Edouard Boujo and Mathieu Sellier describe their approach to finding the best way to cook a crêpe.

Neutrons get a wider angle on DNA and RNA to advance 3-D models

Scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland are using neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to capture new information about DNA and RNA molecules and enable more accurate computer simulations of how they interact with everything from proteins to viruses. Resolving the 3-D structures of the body's fundamental genetic materials in solution will play a vital role in drug discovery and development for critical medical treatments.

Physicists show novel Mott state in twisted graphene bilayers at 'magic angle'

Physicists show the Mott state in graphene bilayers favors ferromagnetic alignment of the electron spins, a phenomenon unheard of in conventional Mott insulators, and a new concept on the novel insulating state observed in twisted graphene bilayers.

High reaction rates even without precious metals

Non-precious metal nanoparticles could one day replace expensive catalysts for hydrogen production. However, it is often difficult to determine what reaction rates they can achieve, especially when it comes to oxide particles. This is because the particles must be attached to the electrode using a binder and conductive additives, which distort the results. With the aid of electrochemical analyses of individual particles, researchers have now succeeded in determining the activity and substance conversion of nanocatalysts made from cobalt iron oxide -- without any binders.

Perfect quantum portal emerges at exotic interface

Researchers have captured the most direct evidence to date of Klein tunneling, a quantum quirk that allows particles to tunnel through a barrier like it's not even there. The result may enable engineers to design more uniform components for future quantum computers, quantum sensors and other devices.

Researchers find quantum gravity has no symmetry

Using holography, researchers have found when gravity is combined with quantum mechanics, symmetry is not possible.

A sound idea: a step towards quantum computing

Researchers have developed a new method for using lasers to create tiny lattice waves inside silicon crystals that can encode quantum information. By taking advantage of existing silicon hardware, this work may greatly reduce the cost of future quantum computers for cryptographic and optimization applications.

Quantum music to my ears

Researchers have applied new atomic-sensing capabilities to detect and record music.

A new force for optical tweezers awakens

When studying biological cells using optical tweezers, one main issue is the damage caused to the cell by the tool. Scientists have discovered a new type of force that will greatly reduce the amount of light used by optical tweezers -- and improve the study of all kinds of cells and particles.

The hunt for hot nuclear matter

In particle physics, a jet is a shower of collimated particles generated by a highly energetic quark or gluon. In a lead-lead collision, jets must traverse through quark gluon plasma, altering their energy, track and consistency.

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