Physics

Diffusing wave paradox may be used to design micro-robotics

Amoeba are unusual creatures that form when a dispersed population of cells spontaneously comes together and reorganizes itself into a multicellular macroscopic organism. To do this, a few leader cells emit chemical pulses that cause the other individual cells to move in the direction opposite to that of the traveling pulses, leading to the formation of dense clusters.

An interaction of slipping beams

Accelerators generate beams of subatomic particles for cutting-edge science. The greater a beam's intensity, the more opportunities there are to study particle interactions. One way to increase the intensity is to merge two beams with a technique called slip-stacking. However, when combining them, the beams' interaction may cause instability.

New result in hunt for mysterious magnetic monopoles

Cutting a magnet in half yields two magnets, each with its own north and south pole. This apparent absence of an isolated magnetic pole, or "magnetic monopole," has puzzled physicists for more than a century. It would seem perfectly natural for a magnetic monopole to exist; Maxwell's equations would reflect complete symmetry between electricity and magnetism if particles with magnetic charge were observed. But the mystery remains: While every known particle is either electrically charged or neutral, none have been found to be magnetically charged.

Our Sun, the Still-mysterious Star That Gives Us Life

When it comes to our local star, science is just warming up.

An innovative electron microscope overturning common knowledge of 88 years history

In conventional electron microscopes, performing atomic-resolution observations of magnetic materials is particularly difficult because high magnetic fields are inevitably exerted on samples inside the magnetic objective lens. Newly developed magnetic objective-lens system provides a magnetic-field-free environment at the sample position. This enables direct, atom-resolved imaging of magnetic materials such as silicon steels. This novel electron microscope is expected to be extensively used for the research and development of advanced magnetic materials.

Engineers design nanostructured diamond metalens for compact quantum technologies

By finding a certain kind of defect inside a block of diamond and fashioning a pattern of nanoscale pillars on the surface above it, engineering researchers can now control the shape of individual photons emitted by the defect. Because those photons carry information about the spin state of an electron, such a system could be used as the basis for compact quantum technologies. 

Tracking major sources of energy loss in compact fusion facilities

Analysis of energy loss in low-aspect ratio tokamaks opens a new chapter in the development of predictions of transport in such facilities.

Plot twist: Straightening single-molecule conductors improves their performance

Researchers have synthesized nanowires made of a single molecule of oligothiophene up to 10 nanometers in length. By forcing the molecular chain to adopt a planar conformation, they were able to significantly enhance its electrical conductivity. The findings have many potential applications for consumer electronics, especially OLED TVs and smartphone screens.

Using a selective light absorber to build a photothermal catalysis system

Researchers at Hebei University in China and Hakkaido University in Japan have recently used a selective light absorber to construct a photothermal system that can generate temperatures up to 288°C under weak solar irradiation (1 kW m-2). This system, presented in Nature Communications, achieved a temperature three times higher than that generated by traditional phototermal catalysis systems.

Direct atom-resolved imaging of magnetic materials

In conventional electron microscopes, performing atomic-resolution observations of magnetic materials is particularly difficult because high magnetic fields are inevitably exerted on samples inside the magnetic objective lens. Newly developed magnetic objective-lens system provides a magnetic-field-free environment at the sample position. This enables direct, atom-resolved imaging of magnetic materials such as silicon steels. This novel electron microscope is expected to be extensively used for the research and development of advanced magnetic materials.

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