Physics

Development of graphene with enhanced speed of high frequency signal transmission

Scientists have developed high frequency signal transmission line technology which maximizes carrier concentration of graphene using graphene-amorphous carbon junction structure.

Novel molecular multi-step photoswitches caught in the act

Scientists have been able to follow the entire sequence of structural transformations in a new class of molecular switches for the first time. By identifying 'control knobs' to direct their operation, better control of their performance is now possible.

Behold the mayo: Experiments reveal 'instability threshold' of elastic-plastic material

Scientist have succeeded in characterizing the interface between an elastic-plastic material and a light material under acceleration.

Physicists propose perfect material for lasers

Weyl semimetals are a recently discovered class of materials in which charge carriers behave the way electrons and positrons do in particle accelerators. Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and Ioffe Institute in St. Petersburg have shown that these materials represent perfect gain media for lasers. The research findings were published in Physical Review B.

Move over, silicon switches: There's a new way to compute

Researchers have introduced a voltage-controlled topological spin switch for logic and memory devices, such as computer hard drives, that now use nanomagnetic mechanisms to store and manipulate information. Unlike silicon transistors, these devices require no energy to maintain their magnetic state: Energy is needed only for reading and writing information. The researchers' innovation greatly reduces the energy and heat used during such reading and writing processes, and may improve security, as well.

Researchers discover a trigger for directed cell motion

When an individual cell is placed on a level surface, it does not keep still, but starts moving. This phenomenon was observed by the British cell biologist Michael Abercrombie as long ago as 1967. Since then, researchers have been thriving to understand how cells accomplish this feat. This much is known: Cells form so-called lamellipodia—cellular protrusions that continuously grow and contract—to propel themselves toward signaling cues such as chemical attractants produced and secreted by other cells.

Mystery of texture of Guinness beer: Inclination angle of a pint glass is key to solution

A team of researchers from Osaka University and Kirin Holdings Company, Limited demonstrated that the texture formation in a pint glass of Guinness beer is induced by flow of a bubble-free fluid film flowing down along the wall of the glass, a world first. This phenomenon is found to be analogous to roll waves commonly observed in water sliding downhill on a rainy day. Their research results were published in Scientific Reports.

New material also reveals new quasiparticles

Researchers at PSI have investigated a novel crystalline material that exhibits electronic properties that have never been seen before. It is a crystal of aluminum and platinum atoms arranged in a special way. In the symmetrically repeating unit cells of this crystal, individual atoms were offset from each other in such a way that they—as connected in the mind's eye—followed the shape of a spiral staircase.

Mars Doesn't Need Our Microbes: How to Keep the Red Planet Pristine

It may be time to change the strict rules in place to keep Earthly microbes from contaminating Mars.

Move over, silicon switches: There's a new way to compute

Logic and memory devices, such as the hard drives in computers, now use nanomagnetic mechanisms to store and manipulate information. Unlike silicon transistors, which have fundamental efficiency limitations, they require no energy to maintain their magnetic state: Energy is needed only for reading and writing information.

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