Physics

Searching for dark matter through the fifth dimension

Theoretical physicists of the PRISMA+ Cluster of Excellence at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz are working on a theory that goes beyond the Standard Model of particle physics and can answer questions where the Standard Model has to pass—for example, with respect to the hierarchies of the masses of elementary particles or the existence of dark matter. The central element of the theory is an extra dimension in spacetime. Until now, scientists have faced the problem that the predictions of their theory could not be tested experimentally.

Paving the way for effective field theories

Over the past century, a wide variety of models have emerged to explain the complex behaviors which unfold within atomic nuclei at low energies. However, these theories bring up deep philosophical questions regarding their scientific value. Indeed, traditional epistemological tools have been rather elaborated to account for a unified and stabilized theory rather than to apprehend a plurality of models. Ideally, a theory is meant to be reductionist, unifying and fundamentalist.

Backreaction observed for first time in water tank black hole simulation

Scientists have revealed new insights into the behavior of black holes with research that demonstrates how a phenomenon called backreaction can be simulated.

A full-scale prototype for muon tomography

Each year, billions of tons of goods are transported globally using cargo containers. Currently, there are concerns that this immense volume of traffic could be exploited to transport illicit nuclear materials, with little chance of detection. One promising approach to combating this issue is to measure how goods interact with charged particles named muons—which form naturally as cosmic rays interact with Earth's atmosphere.

Damatically lowering costs of semiconductor electron sources

Engineers have discovered technology that could slash the cost of semiconductor electron sources, key components in devices ranging from night-vision goggles and low-light cameras to electron microscopes and particle accelerators.

Unlocking the power of a molecule's spin

Behind the devices that shape modern life is an array of natural and human-made materials. One such component of smartphones and computers are rare earth metals, a group of 17 elements that, because they aren't found in concentrated deposits, require energy-intensive and toxic methods to extract. While recycling rare earth metals from used devices is one way to relieve strained supply chains and reduce environmental damage, the fundamental chemistry required for efficiently separating and reusing these metals remains a challenge.

The first observation of a marginal Fermi glass

For several years, the condensed-matter physics community has been trying to gain a better understanding of material systems made up of strongly interacting particles. Interestingly, many metals can be described as systems with effectively weakly interacting electrons, even if interactions between electrons are typically quite strong.

Ultralow magnetic damping of a common metallic ferromagnetic film

Ultralow damping is of key importance for spintronic and spin-orbitronic applications in a range of magnetic materials. However, the number of materials that are suited for charge-based spintronic and spin-orbitronic applications are limited due to magnon-electron scattering. To quantitatively calculate the transition metallic ferromagnetic damping, researchers have proposed theoretical approaches including the breathing Fermi surface model (to describe dissipative magnetization dynamics), generalized torque correlation model, scattering theory, and the linear response damping model.

Solving complex physics problems at lightning speed

A calculation so complex that it takes twenty years to complete on a powerful desktop computer can now be done in one hour on a regular laptop. Physicists have now designed a new method to calculate the properties of atomic nuclei incredibly quickly.

Solving complex physics problems at lightning speed

A calculation so complex that it takes 20 years to complete on a powerful desktop computer can now be done in one hour on a regular laptop. Physicist Andreas Ekström at Chalmers University of Technology, together with international research colleagues, has designed a new method to calculate the properties of atomic nuclei incredibly quickly.

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