Physics

Articles from Science Daily Physics News

System monitors radiation damage to materials in real-time

A new system allows detailed real-time observations of how materials are affected by a high-radiation environment. The system could accelerate the development of better materials for nuclear plants.

Scientists design new material to harness power of light

Scientists have long known that synthetic materials -- called metamaterials -- can manipulate electromagnetic waves such as visible light to make them behave in ways that cannot be found in nature. That has led to breakthroughs such as super-high resolution imaging. Now, scientists are taking the technology of manipulating light in a new direction.

Pressure tuned magnetism paves the way for novel electronic devices

Using very sensitive magnetic probes, an international team of researchers has found surprising evidence that magnetism which emerges at the interfaces between non-magnetic oxide thin layers can be easily tuned by exerting tiny mechanical forces. This discovery provides a new and unexpected handle to control magnetism, thus enabling denser magnetic memory, and opens new and unexpected routes for developing novel oxide-based spintronic devices.

Advancing the description of 'mysterious' water to improve drug design

Interactions with water dominate how drug molecules bind to targets, but it's tricky to model these interactions, limiting the accuracy of drug design. Scientists have now described a novel approach to building a new description of water (known as a force field) and demonstrating its accuracy.

Hiding images and information in plain sight

What is real is not always as it appears. Researchers have found a way to hide information on materials and only make it visible to a person using the right tech.

New type of low-energy nanolaser that shines in all directions

Researchers have developed a new type of low-energy, nanoscale laser that shines in all directions. The key to its omnidirectional light emission is the introduction of something that is usually highly undesirable in nanotechnology: irregularities in the materials. The researchers foresee a vast range of potential applications, but first they hope their fundamental work will inspire others to further improve it and deepen the understanding.

Adhesives for biomedical applications can be detached with light

Pulling off a little plastic bandage may soon get a lot less painful. Researchers have developed a new type of adhesive that can strongly adhere wet materials -- such as hydrogel and living tissue -- and be easily detached with a specific frequency of light. The adhesives could be used to attach and painlessly detach wound dressings, transdermal drug delivery devices, and wearable robotics.

Quantum chemical calculations on quantum computers

A new quantum algorithm has been implemented for quantum chemical calculations such as Full-CI on quantum computers without exponential/combinatorial explosion, giving exact solutions of Schroedinger Equations for atoms and molecules, for the first time.

Shrinking objects to the nanoscale

Researchers have invented a new way to fabricate nanoscale 3D objects of nearly any shape. They can also pattern the objects with a variety of useful materials, including metals, semiconducting quantum dots, and DNA.

Machine learning to speed chemical discoveries, reduce waste

Researchers have combined artificial neural networks with infrared thermal imaging to control and interpret chemical reactions with new precision and speed. Novel microreactors allow chemical discoveries to take place quickly and with far less environmental waste than standard large-scale reactions. The system can reduce the decision-making process about certain chemical manufacturing processes from one year to a matter of weeks, saving tons of chemical waste and energy in the process.

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