Physics

Yale scientist sheds fresh light on Einstein

Albert Einstein's celebrated genius may be underappreciated, according to a new book by Yale physicist A. Douglas Stone: The father of relativity theory deserves far more credit than he gets for his insights into quantum theory.

Physics duo suggest using early universe inflation as graviton detector

(Phys.org) —Physicists Lawrence Krauss and Frank Wilczek of Arizona State University and Australian National University, respectively, have uploaded a paper to the preprint server arXiv, in which they propose that it might be possible to establish the quantization of gravity by measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Doing so they suggest, would provide a link between it and gravitational waves caused by inflation in the early universe.

Spinach and nanodiamonds? nanodiamond biosensor for detection of iron-level in blood

Popeye, the comic book hero, swears by it as do generations of parents who delight their children with spinach. Of course, today it is known that the vegetable is not quite as rich in iron as originally thought, but that iron is nevertheless essential for our physical well-being is undisputed. Lack of iron -- caused by malnutrition -- can lead to anemia while an increased level of iron may signal the presence of an acute inflammatory response. Therefore, the blood iron level is an important medical diagnostic agent.

Supercomputing the transition from ordinary to extraordinary forms of matter

(Phys.org) —To get a better understanding of the subatomic soup that filled the early universe, and how it "froze out" to form the atoms of today's world, scientists are taking a closer look at the nuclear phase diagram. Like a map that describes how the physical state of water morphs from solid ice to liquid to steam with changes in temperature and pressure, the nuclear phase diagram maps out different phases of the components of atomic nuclei—from the free quarks and gluons that existed at the dawn of time to the clusters of protons and neutrons that make up the cores of atoms today.

Recent study reduces Casimir force to lowest recorded level

Scientists have recorded a drastically reduced measurement of the Casimir effect, a fundamental quantum phenomenon experienced between two neutral bodies that exist in a vacuum.

Recent study reduces Casimir force to lowest recorded level

(Phys.org) —A research team that includes a physics professor at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) has recorded a drastically reduced measurement of the Casimir effect, a fundamental quantum phenomenon experienced between two neutral bodies that exist in a vacuum.

Supercomputers help solve a 50-year homework assignment

A group of theoretical physicists has solved half of a 50-year homework assignment —- a calculation of one type of subatomic particle decay aimed at helping to answer the question of why the early universe ended up with an excess of matter.

Supercomputing the transition from ordinary to extraordinary forms of matter

Calculations plus experimental data help map nuclear phase diagram, offering insight into transition that mimics formation of visible matter in the universe today.

'Walking droplets': Strange behavior of bouncing drops demonstrates pilot-wave dynamics in action

A research team recently discovered that it’s possible to make a tiny fluid droplet levitate on the surface of a vibrating bath, walking or bouncing across, propelled by its own wave field. Surprisingly, these walking droplets exhibit certain features previously thought to be exclusive to the microscopic quantum realm. This finding of quantum-like behavior inspired a team of researchers to examine the dynamics of these walking droplets.

Solar power's future brawl

Scientists have turned to computer modeling to help decide which of two competing materials should get its day in the sun as the nanoscale energy-harvesting technology of future solar panels -- quantum dots or nanowires.

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