Physics

Following Higgs discovery, physicists offer vision to unravel mysteries of universe

After nine days of intensive discussions, nearly 700 particle physicists from about 100 universities and laboratories concluded nine months of work with a unified framework for unmasking the hidden secrets of matter, energy, space and time during the next two decades.

Atomic clock can simulate quantum magnetism

Researchers have for the first time used an atomic clock as a quantum simulator, mimicking the behavior of a different, more complex quantum system. All but the smallest, most trivial quantum systems are too complicated to simulate on classical computers, hence the interest in quantum simulators to understand the quantum mechanical behavior of exotic materials such as high-temperature superconductors.

Fast detector for a wide wavelength range

Free-electron lasers are extremely versatile research tools because their intense, super short light flashes permit a closer look at new materials and even biological molecules; thus, allowing effects to be observed that had not been known previously. For pulsed lasers in the far infrared range, the so-called terahertz range, scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have developed a robust and fast detector which can measure the arrival of a terahertz pulse with great accuracy. The results were published in the scientific journal Applied Physics Letters.

Theorist helps sharpen tests of fundamental theory in high energy experiments

(Phys.org) —Three theoretical physicists have taken an important step toward eliminating theoretical ambiguities from the staggeringly complicated mathematics used to explore the interactions of quarks, the tiniest known bits of matter inside protons and neutrons, and gluons, the enigmatic particles responsible for keeping them trapped there. Simplifying these calculations can make them easier for other particle theorists to perform and lead to more accurate predictions for experimental particle physicists to test.

A new tool to split X-ray laser pulses

(Phys.org) —A new tool at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source splits individual X-ray laser pulses into two pulses that can hit a target one right after another with precisely controlled timing, allowing scientists to trigger and measure specific ultrafast changes in atoms and molecules.

Fast detector for a wide wavelength range

Free-electron lasers are extremely versatile research tools because their intense, super short light flashes permit a closer look at new materials and even biological molecules; thus, allowing effects to be observed that had not been known previously. For pulsed lasers in the far infrared range, the so-called terahertz range, scientists have developed a robust and fast detector which can measure the arrival of a terahertz pulse with great accuracy.

New forensic technique for analyzing lipstick traces

A study by forensic scientists has established a new way of identifying which brand of lipstick someone was wearing at a crime scene without removing the evidence from its bag, thereby avoiding possible contamination.

Molecules form 2-D patterns never before observed: Nanoscience experiments produce elusive 5-vertex tilings

Tessellation patterns that have fascinated mathematicians since Kepler worked out their systematics 400 years ago -- and that more recently have caught the eye of artists and crystallographers -- can now be seen in the laboratory. They first took shape on a surface more perfectly two-dimensional than any sheet of paper, a single layer of atoms and molecules atop an atomically smooth substrate. Physicists coaxed these so-called Kepler tilings "onto the page" through guided self-assembly of nanostructures.

NASA's Journey to Tomorrow Traveling Exhibit Featured at Eastern Michigan University

Visitors to Ypsilanti Heritage Festival invited to visit NASA’s Traveling Exhibit at Eastern Michigan University Star Party Aug. 16-17.

The Challenge is On: NASA-WPI 2014 Robot Prize Competition Registration Open

In pursuit of new technological solutions for America's space program and our nation's future, NASA and the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) in Worcester, Mass., have opened registration for the $1.5 million 2014 Sample Return Robot prize competition.

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