Physics

Magnetic materials: Forging ahead with a back-to-basics approach

Atomic-level simulations hint at how to control the magnetic properties of layered materials for data storage applications.

Physicists use element 115 to highlight a way for taking new superheavy elements' fingerprints

An international team of researchers presents fresh evidence that confirms the existence of the superheavy chemical element 115. The experiment was conducted at the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, an accelerator laboratory located in Darmstadt. Under the lead of physicists from Lund University in Sweden, the group, which included researchers from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM), was able to present a way to directly identify new superheavy elements. Elements beyond atomic number 104 are referred to as superheavy elements.

Charting the Curiosities at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

One graphic designer took it upon himself to create a walking map of JPL's sprawling, fascinating research labs in Pasadena, Calif.

New insights on wildfire smoke could improve climate change models

By viewing particles captured during the 2011 Las Conchas fire in New Mexico under a field emission scanning electron microscope, scientists found that there's more to tar balls and soot than meets the naked eye.

New superheavy elements can be uniquely identified

Researchers presents fresh evidence that confirms the existence of the superheavy chemical element 115. The experiment provided a way to directly identify new superheavy elements. Elements beyond atomic number 104 are referred to as superheavy elements. They are produced at accelerator laboratories and generally decay after a short time. Initial reports about the discovery of an element with atomic number 115 were released from a research center in Russia in 2004. The then presented indirect evidence for the new element, however, was insufficient for an official discovery.

Cosmic ray finding: Researchers take a step closer to finding cosmic ray origins

(Phys.org) —The origin of cosmic rays in the universe has confounded scientists for decades. But a study by researchers using data from the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole reveals new information that may help unravel the longstanding mystery of exactly how and where these "rays" (they are actually high-energy particles) are produced.

Rethinking surface tension

(Phys.org) —If you've ever watched a drop of water form into a bead or a water strider scoot across a pond, you are familiar with a property of liquids called surface tension.

Researchers a step closer to finding cosmic ray origins

The origin of cosmic rays in the universe has confounded scientists for decades. But new information that may help unravel the longstanding mystery of exactly how and where they are produced.

NASA Astronaut Mike Hopkins Available for Interviews before Space Mission

NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, scheduled to travel to the International Space Station in September, will be available for live satellite interviews from 7-8 a.m. EDT Monday, Sept. 9.

Novel topological crystalline insulator shows mass appeal

Physicists have theorized that topological crystalline insulators possess unique surface states as a result of crystalline symmetry. An international team of researchers has confirmed that experimental signature and revealed that disrupting the lattice-like structure imparts mass upon previously mass-less electrons. Furthermore, the researchers found manipulating structural symmetry offers a degree of control over the electronic phases of the solid-state material.

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