Physics

Research team uses artificial muscles to develop an air conditioner for the future

It can be used to cool or heat the air in a room or to cool or heat liquids. And it looks like something that Q—the tech specialist and gadgeteer in the James Bond films—might have come up with. The prototype device, which has been developed by a research team led by Professors Stefan Seelecke and Andreas Schütze at Saarland University, is able to transfer heat using 'muscles' made from nickel-titanium.

These New Technologies Could Make Interstellar Travel Real

Long considered science fiction, leaving the solar system and speeding amid the stars may soon be within reach.

Can artificial intelligence solve the mysteries of quantum physics?

A new study has demonstrated mathematically that algorithms based on deep neural networks can be applied to better understand the world of quantum physics, as well.

Tied in knots: New insights into plasma behavior focus on twists and turns

Findings from an international team of scientists show that twisted magnetic fields can evolve in only so many ways, with the plasma inside them following a general rule.

An electronically tunable metasurface that rotates polarization

Researchers at the University of Michigan and City University of New York have recently proposed and experimentally validated a transparent, electronically tunable metasurface. This metasurface, presented in a paper published in Physical Review X, can rotate the polarization of an arbitrarily polarized incident wave without changing its axial ratio.

Investigation of the origin of heavy elements

Atomic physicists working on nuclear fusion research succeeded in computing the world's highest accuracy atomic data of neodymium ions which is used in analysis of the light from a binary neutron star merger. This research accelerates studies of a long-standing mystery about the cosmic origins of heavy elements.

Physicists lower threshold for detecting extremely weak magnetic signals

Physicists at Saarland University have developed magnetic field sensors that are breaking sensitivity records and opening up a whole range of potential new applications, from non-contact measurements of the electrical activity in the human heart or brain to detecting ore deposits or archaeological remains deep underground. Professor Uwe Hartmann and his research team have developed a system that allows them to detect weak magnetic signals over large distances in normal environments (no vacuum, no low temperatures, no shielding), despite the presence of numerous sources of interference.

Are Humans or Robots Better Fit for Exploring Space?

Experts debate whether people or probes make the best space explorers.

Why Fermilab is Making A Neutrino Detector 800 Miles Long

Researchers hope an underground experiment will reveal an elusive particle.

Researchers report new light-activated micro pump

Even the smallest mechanical pumps have limitations, from the complex microfabrication techniques required to make them to the fact that there are limits on how small they can be. Researchers have announced a potential solution—a laser-driven photoacoustic microfluidic pump, capable of moving fluids in any direction without moving parts or electrical contacts.

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