Physics

The waltz of the LHC magnets has begun

Major endeavors are underway in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) over the past few weeks, with the extraction of magnets from the accelerator tunnel. The LHC has a total of 1232 dipoles, magnets which bend the particles' trajectories, and 474 quadrupoles, which squeeze the bunches. All these magnets are superconducting, i.e. they operate at a temperature of -271°C, are 15 meters long and weigh up to 28 tons. So moving them around is no trivial matter.

Radon inferior to radion for electric dipole moments (EDM) searches

An international research team led by the University of Liverpool has made a discovery that will help with the search for electric dipole moments (EDM) in atoms and could contribute to new theories of particle physics, such as supersymmetry.

How a giant 'thermos bottle' will help in understanding antimatter

One of the big questions physicists are trying to answer is what happened to all the antimatter in our universe. The universe was born out of a hot soup of both matter and antimatter particles (for example, the antiparticle to an electron is a positron). But something happened billions of years ago to tip the balance to matter, and antimatter disappeared. In fact, if this had not happened, we humans would not be here: when antimatter and matter particles collide, they transform into pure energy.

The secret to making stuff better? Shoot it with a laser

Faster computers. More efficient solar panels. More powerful electric cars.

Chip design dramatically reduces energy needed to compute with light

MIT researchers have developed a novel "photonic" chip that uses light instead of electricity—and consumes relatively little power in the process. The chip could be used to process massive neural networks millions of times more efficiently than today's classical computers do.

New mechanism allows lower energy requirement for OLED displays

Scientists have found a way to significantly reduce the amount of energy required by organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs).

New mechanism allows lower energy requirement for OLED displays

Scientists from RIKEN and the University of California San Diego, in collaboration with international partners have found a way to significantly reduce the amount of energy required by organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). OLEDs have attracted attention as potential replacements for liquid crystal diodes, since they offer advantages such as being flexible, thin, and not requiring backlighting.

Making a splash is all in the angle

Making a splash depends on the angle of a liquid as it hits and moves along a surface, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London.

Plasma created using nanowires and long-wavelength ultrashort pulse laser

Physicists have developed a new method for producing plasma, enabling them to deal with some of the problems that stand in the way of this extremely difficult process.

No assumptions needed to simulate petroleum reservoirs

Hidden deep below our feet, petroleum reservoirs are made up of hydrocarbons like oil and natural gas, stored within porous rock. These systems are particularly interesting to physicists, as they clearly show how temperature gradients between different regions affect the gradients of fluid pressures and compositions. However, because these reservoirs are so hard to access, researchers can only model them using data from a few sparse points, meaning many of their properties can only be guessed at.

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