Physics

Video: Small angle neutron scattering

SINE2020 and the Institute Laue-Langevin in Grenoble, France have collaborated to produce a motion design video highlighting how small angle neutron scattering (SANS) can be used to track the description, distribution, and evolution of microstructures.

Process of adhesive wear simulated

Using high-performance computer simulations, researchers were able to observe how surface roughness changes when two materials rub together. Their findings, which provide insight into friction and wear mechanisms, have implications for areas ranging from engineering to the study of tectonic faults.

A thermo-sensor for magnetic bits

Scientists of the Department of Physics at the University of Hamburg, Germany, detected the magnetic states of atoms on a surface using only heat. The respective study is published in a recent volume of Science. A magnetic needle heated by a laser beam was placed in close proximity to a magnetic surface with a gap of only a few atoms width. The temperature difference between the needle and the surface generates an electric voltage.

New report on industrial physics and its role in the US economy

Industrial physics plays a significant role in driving the U.S. economy, according to a new report by the American Physical Society, which will be described this week at the 2019 APS March Meeting in Boston.

New report on industrial physics and its role in the U.S. economy

A new report shows the significant role of physics, which contributed an estimated $2.3 trillion (12.6 percent of U.S. GDP) in 2016 alone. Industrial physics encompasses the application of physics knowledge and principles to the design and manufacture of products and services. Many people working within this field have job titles other than physicist, so this report includes all aspects of industrial physics contributions.

New cell-sized micro robots might make incredible journeys

Researchers have created tiny functional, remote-powered, walking robots, developing a multistep nanofabrication technique that turns a 4-inch specialized silicon wafer into a million microscopic robots in just weeks. Each one of a robot's four legs is just under 100-atoms-thick, but powered by laser light hitting the robots' solar panels, they propel the tiny robots. The researchers are now working on smart versions of the robots that could potentially make incredible journeys in the human body.

Physicists discover surprisingly complex states emerging out of simple synchronized networks

Fireflies, heart cells, clocks, and power grids all do it—they can spontaneously sync up, sending signals out in unison. For centuries, scientists have been perplexed by this self-organizing behavior, coming up with theories and experiments that make up the science of sync. But despite progress being made in the field, mysteries still persist—in particular how networks of completely identical elements can fall out of sync.

Breakthrough could enable cheaper infrared cameras

A breakthrough in quantum dot technology may one day lead to much more cost-effective infrared cameras -- which in turn could enable infrared cameras for common consumer electronics like phones, as well as sensors to help autonomous cars see their surroundings more accurately.

Stressing and straining: Geochemists answer fundamental question of mineral reactions

Scientists placed small iron oxide particles in an acidic solution, causing a reaction at the surface as iron atoms oxidized. As the reaction progressed, the researchers observed strain that built up and penetrated inside the mineral particle.

New graphene-based device is first step toward ultrasensitive biosensors

Researchers have developed a unique new device using the wonder material graphene that provides the first step toward ultrasensitive biosensors to detect diseases at the molecular level with near perfect efficiency.

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