Physics

Electronics of the future: A new energy-efficient mechanism using the Rashba effect

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology proposed new quasi-1-D materials for potential spintronic applications, an upcoming technology that exploits the spin of electrons. They performed simulations to demonstrate the spin properties of these materials and explained the mechanisms behind their behavior.

Electronics of the future: A new energy-efficient mechanism using the Rashba effect

Scientists have proposed new quasi-1D materials for potential spintronic applications, an upcoming technology that exploits the spin of electrons. They performed simulations to demonstrate the spin properties of these materials and explained the mechanisms behind their behavior.

Nucleus-specific X-ray stain for 3-D virtual histology

Histology is used to identify structural details of tissue at the microscale in the pathology lab, but analyses remain two-dimensional (2D) as they are limited to the same plane. Nondestructive 3D technologies including X-ray micro and nano-computed tomography (nanoCT) have proven validity to understand anatomical structures, since they allow arbitrary viewing angles and 3D structural detail. However, low attenuation of soft tissue has hampered their application in the field of 3D virtual histology.

50 Years Later, Still Processing Apollo 8's Message of Hope and Desolation

Some two billion years ago, the first photosynthetic algae evolved the ability to respond to light—the brilliant Sun by day, the spectral Moon by night. Around 700 million years ago, primitive eye-pits appeared; then, during the Cambrian era, arthropod-like creatures gazed at the sky through true eyes, sensing the lunar rising and setting with their arthropod-like comprehension. So it continued, into the succeeding chapters of life featuring mammals, primates, hominins, and Homo sapiens, the

The coolest experiment in the universe

NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory on the International Space Station is the first facility in orbit to produce clouds of "ultracold" atoms, which can reach a fraction of a degree above absolute zero. Nothing in nature is known to hit the temperatures achieved in laboratories like CAL, which means the orbiting facility is regularly the coldest known spot in the universe.

Description of rotating molecules made easy

By turning highly complex equations into sets of simple diagrams, Feynman diagrams have established themselves as one of the sharpest tools in a theoretical physicist's toolbox. Scientists have now extended the technique: originally devised for subatomic particles, the simplest objects imaginable, the technique can now work with molecules. The research is expected to drastically simplify the description of molecular rotations in solvents.

Strong interactions produce a dance between light and sound

Light and high-frequency acoustic sound waves in a tiny glass structure can strongly couple to one another and perform a dance in step.

Quantum tricks to unveil the secrets of topological materials

'Topological materials' produce electron states that can be very interesting for technical applications, but it is extremely difficult to identify these materials and their associated electronic states. A 'crystal' made of light waves can now be used to deliberately drive the system out of equilibrium. By switching between simple and complicated states, the system reveals whether or not it has topologically interesting states.

Researchers monitor electron behavior during chemical reactions for the first time

Researchers demonstrated their ability to observe electrons' movements during a chemical reaction.

Electrically charged Higgs versus physicists: 1-0 until break

The last missing particle of the Standard Model, the Higgs boson, was discovered in 2012 in experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. Since then, searching for new, related particles has been underway. Predicted by various theories that go beyond known physics, Higgs bosons with positive or negative electric charge are among the candidates to be observed. But do these particles really exist?

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