Physics

Cooling with molecules

An international team of scientists have become the first ever researchers to successfully reach temperatures below minus 272.15 degrees Celsius – only just above absolute zero – using magnetic molecules. The physicists and chemists are presenting their new investigation today in the scientific journal Nature Communications. It was developed by six scientists from Bielefeld University, the University of Manchester, and the Universidad de Zaragoza.

NASA Awards Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder for the Joint Polar Satellite System-2 Mission

NASA has awarded a sole source contract modification to Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems, of Azusa, California, for the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) Instrument for flight on the Joint Polar Satellite System-2 (JPSS-2) mission.

NASA TV Broadcasts Space Station Cargo Ship Activities

NASA Television will broadcast live the departure of an unpiloted Russian cargo spacecraft from the International Space Station (ISS) Monday, Oct. 27, as well as the launch and docking of its replacement Wednesday, Oct. 29.

Technique for heat-assisted magnetic recording media promises improved writeability for next-generation hard drives

Heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) is a new process that realizes the three goals of magnetic recording—readability, writeability and stability. A*STAR researchers have now succeeded in improving its writeability by employing a thermal design that permits a higher density recording1.

Linear accelerator could improve X-rays, particle colliders

One drizzly morning in September, a giant metal tube painted Cornell red was loaded on a truck at the Wilson Synchrotron Laboratory annex to make a slow, steady journey across campus.

Seeking 'absolute zero', copper cube gets chillingly close

An Italian lab has cooled a cubic metre of copper to within a tiny fraction of "absolute zero", setting a world record, the National Nuclear Physics Institute said Tuesday.

Special microscope captures defects in nanotubes

Chemists have devised a way to see the internal structures of electronic waves trapped in carbon nanotubes by external electrostatic charges. Carbon nanotubes have been touted as exceptional materials with unique properties that allow for extremely efficient charge and energy transport, with the potential to open the way for new, more efficient types of electronic and photovoltaic devices. However, these traps, or defects, in ultra-thin nanotubes can compromise their effectiveness.

Exploring X-ray phase tomography with synchrotron radiation

X-ray phase tomography is an imaging technique that uses penetrating X-rays to create volumetric views through "slices" or sections of soft biological tissues, such as tumors, and it offers strongly enhanced contrast compared to conventional CT scans. Yet scientists still do not know which X-ray phase tomography methods are best suited to yield optimized results for a wide variety of conditions.

Backpack physics: Smaller hikers carry heavier loads

Hikers are generally advised that the weight of the packs they carry should correspond to their own size, with smaller individuals carrying lighter loads. Although petite backpackers might appreciate the excuse to hand off heavier gear to the larger members of the group, it turns out that they may not need the help.

Scientists disprove theory that reconstructed boron surface is metallic

Scientific inquiry is a hit and miss proposition, subject to constant checking and rechecking. Recently, a new class of materials was discovered called topological insulators—nonmetallic materials with a metallic surface capable of conducting electrons. The effect, based on relativity theory, exists only in special materials -— those with heavy elements —- and has the potential to revolutionize electronics.

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