Physics

How to merge two black holes in a simple way

The merger of two black holes, such as the one which produced the gravitational waves discovered by the LIGO Observatory, is considered an extremely complex process that can only be simulated by the world's most powerful supercomputers. However, two theoretical physicists from the University of Barcelona (Spain) have demonstrated that what occurs on the space-time boundary of the two merging objects can be explained using simple equations, at least when a giant black hole collides with a tiny black hole.

NASA Awards Launch Range Operations Services Contract

NASA has awarded a sole-source bridge contract to LJT and Associates Inc. of Columbia, Maryland, to continue critical launch range operations support at the agency’s Wallops Flight Facility in Wallops Island, Virginia.

NASA Awards Contract for Security Services at its Stennis Space Center

NASA has awarded a contract to RiverTech, LLC, of Colorado Springs, Colorado, for a range of security services at the agency’s Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi.

Scientists find twisting 3-D raceway for electrons in nanoscale crystal slices

An exotic 3-D racetrack for electrons in ultrathin slices of a crystal has been observed for the first time, by a group of researchers. The ultimate goal of this research is to approach the lossless conduction of another class of materials, known as superconductors, but without the need for the extreme, freezing temperatures that superconductors require.

Researchers figure out how to improve centrifuge efficiency

MEPhI researchers have created the world's first formula to describe the separative power of a concurrent centrifuge for binary mixture, which will improve the devices' efficiency.

Pioneering California physicist dies; built important tool

A pioneering physicist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has died.

Many theories predict existence of magnetic monopoles, but experiments have yet to see them

If you chop a magnet in half, you end up with two smaller magnets. Both the original and the new magnets have "north" and "south" poles.

X-ray laser glimpses how electrons dance with atomic nuclei in materials

From hard to malleable, from transparent to opaque, from channeling electricity to blocking it: Materials come in all types. A number of their intriguing properties originate in the way a material's electrons "dance" with its lattice of atomic nuclei, which is also in constant motion due to vibrations known as phonons.

X-ray laser glimpses how electrons dance with atomic nuclei in materials

The coupling between electrons and phonons determines how efficiently solar cells convert sunlight into electricity. It also plays key roles in superconductors that transfer electricity without losses, topological insulators that conduct electricity only on their surfaces, materials that drastically change their electrical resistance when exposed to a magnetic field, and more.

Great expectations from fewer collisions

Usually, the motto of the LHC is 'maximum luminosity' (in other words, as many collisions as possible).

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