Physics

American Physical Society and CERN sign an open access agreement for SCOAP3

The American Physical Society (APS) and The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), as the Host Organization of SCOAP3 (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics), are pleased to announce that they have entered into an agreement to publish high-energy physics (HEP) articles in three leading journals of the APS - Physical Review Letters, Physical Review D, and Physical Review C—under an open access agreement.

Light has new capacity for electronics

In 'Minority Report,' the protagonist uses gloves that give him the power of virtual manipulation. The light seems to allow him to control the screen as if it were a touchscreen, but he's touching nothing but air. That technology is still science fiction, but a new study may bring it closer to reality. Researchers report that they have discovered the photodielectric effect, which could lead to laser-controlled touch displays.

New analysis of brain network activity offers unique insight into epileptic seizures

Epilepsy is a complex neurological disorder that afflicts approximately 50 million people worldwide. Although this disease has been known to exist for centuries, the exact mechanism of its cardinal symptom, the epileptic seizure, remains poorly understood. In fact, roughly 25 percent of epileptic seizures can't be controlled by any of the therapies available today.

Looking for the quantum frontier

A new theoretical framework has been developed to identify computations that occupy the 'quantum frontier' - the boundary at which problems become impossible for today's computers and can only be solved by a quantum computer. The team demonstrates that these computations can be performed with near-term, intermediate, quantum computers.

Using math to investigate possibility of time travel

After some serious number crunching, a researcher says that he has come up with a mathematical model for a viable time machine: a Traversable Acausal Retrograde Domain in Space-time (TARDIS). He describes it as a bubble of space-time geometry which carries its contents backward and forwards through space and time as it tours a large circular path. The bubble moves through space-time at speeds greater than the speed of light at times, allowing it to move backward in time.

NIST invents fundamental component for 'spintronic' computing

NIST has been granted a patent for technology that may hasten the advent of a long-awaited new generation of high-performance, low-energy computers.

Tracking particles at the energy frontier

A new age of exploration dawned at the start of Run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider, as protons began colliding at the unprecedented centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The ATLAS experiment now frequently observes highly collimated bundles of particles (known as jets) with energies of up to multiple TeV, as well as tau-leptons and b-hadrons that pass through the innermost detector layers before decaying.

Study offers new theoretical approach to describing non-equilibrium phase transitions

Imaginary numbers are a solution to a very real problem in a study published today in Scientific Reports.

Move over, Superman! NIST method sees through concrete to detect early-stage corrosion

When you suffer a fall, an on-the-field collision or some other traumatic blow, the first thing the doctor will do is take an X-ray, CT scan or MRI to determine if anything has been damaged internally. Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are using the same principle, but in a more powerful form, to detect corrosion, the primary danger threatening the health of the steel framework within the nation's bridges, roads and other aging physical infrastructure.

Seeing is believing: Diamond quantum sensor reveals current flows in next-gen materials

In a world-first, researchers have imaged electrons moving in graphene using a quantum probe found only in diamonds. The technique could be used to understand electron behavior and allow researchers to improve the reliability and performance of existing and emerging technologies. These images could reveal the microscopic behavior of currents in quantum computing devices, graphene and other 2-D materials, and be used to develop next generation electronics, energy storage (batteries), flexible displays and bio-chemical sensors.

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