Physics

Argonne research expanding from injectors to inhalers

There is a world of difference between tailpipes and windpipes, but researchers at the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have managed to link the two with groundbreaking research that could enable exciting advances in prescription drug delivery devices.

New materials discovered to detect neutrons emitted by radioactive materials

Scientist Christopher Lavelle of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, together with a team of researchers from the University of Maryland and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, has successfully shown that boron-coated vitreous carbon foam can be used in the detection of neutrons emitted by radioactive materials—of critical importance to homeland security. Lavelle is lead author of the paper "Demonstration of Neutron Detection Utilizing Open Cell Foam and Noble Gas Scintillation" released today in the journal Applied Physics Letters.

Pennies reveal new insights on the nature of randomness

The concept of randomness appears across scientific disciplines, from materials science to molecular biology. Now, theoretical chemists at Princeton have challenged traditional interpretations of randomness by computationally generating random and mechanically rigid arrangements of two-dimensional hard disks, such as pennies, for the first time.

Higgs particle can disintegrate into particles of dark matter, according to new model

The 'Standard Model' of particle physics successfully describes the smallest constituents of matter. But the model has its limitations – it does not explain the dark matter of the universe. Christoffer Petersson, a research scientist at Chalmers University of Technology, has found a solution. His theories are now being tested at the particle physics laboratory CERN.

NASA Opens Media Accreditation for Next SpaceX Space Station Mission Launch

Media accreditation is open for the launch of NASA's next commercial cargo resupply flight to the International Space Station. SpaceX and NASA soon will set an April target date for launch of the company’s Dragon spacecraft on a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida.

NASA Television to Air Major SLS Booster Test Firing Events, Media Invited

The largest, most powerful booster ever built for NASA's new rocket, the Space Launch System (SLS), will fire up for a ground test at 11:30 a.m. EDT (9:30 a.m. MDT) Wednesday, March 11, at Orbital ATK Propulsion Systems’ test facilities in Promontory, Utah.

NASA Television to Air Major SLS Booster Test Firing Events, Media Invited

The largest, most powerful booster ever built for NASA's new rocket, the Space Launch System (SLS), will fire up for a ground test at 11:30 a.m. EDT (9:30 a.m. MDT) Wednesday, March 11, at Orbital ATK Propulsion Systems’ test facilities in Promontory, Utah.

NASA Television to Air Space Station Change of Commander, Return of Three Crew Members

Three International Space Station crew members are scheduled to leave the orbiting laboratory Wednesday, March 11 after almost six months in space performing scientific research and technology demonstrations.

NASA’s Chandra Observatory Finds Cosmic Showers Halt Galaxy Growth

Astronomers have found that the growth of galaxies containing black holes can be slowed down by a phenomenon referred to as cosmic precipitation.

Theorist suggests a way to test gravitational Casimir attraction

(Phys.org)—James Quach, a research fellow at Tokyo University is suggesting that it might be possible to observe a gravitational Casimir attraction by carrying out an experiment he has envisioned. In his paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, he suggests that it might be possible to detect such an attraction using two mirrors that are able to reflect gravitational waves.

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