Physics

Star Formation is Coming to a Close

A composite image of a molecular cloud used as a model to determine how stars are formed.
Hot off the astronomical press: the star census is complete. An international team of astronomers has conducted the first, comprehensive survey of stellar formation in the universe. The undertaking was ten times bigger than any star formation study before it, and confirmed that the rate of star formation has slowed significantly over time. But the researchers upped the stakes with this one by finding that

Star Formation is Coming to a Close

A composite image of a molecular cloud used as a model to determine how stars are formed.
Hot off the astronomical press: the star census is complete. An international team of astronomers has conducted the first, comprehensive survey of stellar formation in the universe. The undertaking was ten times bigger than any star formation study before it, and confirmed that the rate of star formation has slowed significantly over time. But the researchers upped the stakes with this one by finding that

Mysteries of the neutrino: Physicists investigate the Big Bang particle

Physicists at some of the world's leading research institutes are attempting to unravel the mysteries of a particle that played a role in the creation of the universe. The existence of neutrinos and anti-neutrinos -- particles that are almost massless and which travel at light speed from one side of Earth to the other -- was confirmed more than 50 years ago. Scientists believe that they were created at the Big Bang and might hold the key to the nature of the universe. But they are light particles that react weakly with matter and they change properties as they travel.

First 'snapshots' of electronic structure of a manganese complex related to water-splitting in photosynthesis

Scientists have taken another step toward an understanding of photosynthesis and developing artificial photosynthesis. With a combination of a x-ray free-electron laser and spectroscopy, the team has managed to see the electronic structure of a manganese complex, a chemical compound related to how photosynthesis splits water.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/sciencedaily/matter_energy/physics/~4/a-G... height="1" width="1"/>

NASA Renames Radiation Belt Mission to Honor Pioneering Scientist

NASA has renamed a recently launched mission that studies Earth's radiation belts as the Van Allen Probes in honor of the late James Van Allen.

Nanocrystals and nickel catalyst substantially improve light-based hydrogen production

Hydrogen is an attractive fuel source because it can easily be converted into electric energy and gives off no greenhouse emissions. Chemists are now adding to its appeal by increasing the output and lowering the cost of current light-driven hydrogen-production systems.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/sciencedaily/matter_energy/physics/~4/ijq... height="1" width="1"/>

Nanoparticles: When less is more in predicting performance

A computational approach that makes processor-intensive first-principle calculations more manageable is now available to predict the structure of nano-alloy catalysts.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/sciencedaily/matter_energy/physics/~4/Qsm... height="1" width="1"/>

Millimeter-wave oscillation by ferromagnetic nanocontact device

Researchers have demonstrated theoretically that oscillation of 5–140 GHz is possible by supplying direct current to a ferromagnetic nanocontact device.

Uwingu wants you to submit names for their planetary baby book

Astronomers are discovering a lot of planets these days. The official count is 800+, with thousands of more candidates (unconfirmed but suspiciously planet-like).

Right now we give them alphabet soup names. Alpha Centauri Bb. HR 8799b (through HR8799 e). And of course, everyone's favorite, 2MASS J04414489+2301513b.

These catalog names are useful, but less than public friendly. In science fiction we get Vulcan, Psychon, Arrakis, and other cool names. So why not in real life?

Uwingu wants you to submit names for their planetary baby book

Astronomers are discovering a lot of planets these days. The official count is 800+, with thousands of more candidates (unconfirmed but suspiciously planet-like).

Right now we give them alphabet soup names. Alpha Centauri Bb. HR 8799b (through HR8799 e). And of course, everyone's favorite, 2MASS J04414489+2301513b.

These catalog names are useful, but less than public friendly. In science fiction we get Vulcan, Psychon, Arrakis, and other cool names. So why not in real life?

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