Physics

A torque on conventional magnetic wisdom

Physicists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have observed a magnetic phenomenon called the "anomalous spin-orbit torque" (ASOT) for the first time. Professor Virginia Lorenz and graduate student Wenrui Wang, now graduated and employed as an industry scientist, made this observation, demonstrating that there exists competition between what is known as spin-orbit coupling and the alignment of an electron spin to the magnetization. This can be thought of as analogous to the anomalous Hall effect (AHE).

A torque on conventional magnetic wisdom

Physicists have observed a magnetic phenomenon called the 'anomalous spin-orbit torque' (ASOT) for the first time. Scientists have made this observation, demonstrating that there exists competition between what is known as spin-orbit coupling and the alignment of an electron spin to the magnetization.

ATLAS Experiment searches for rare Higgs boson decays into muon pairs

Could the Higgs boson still surprise us? Since its discovery in 2012, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations at CERN have been actively studying the properties of this latest and most mysterious addition to the Standard Model of particle physics. 

Record-setting quantum motion

Showcasing precise control at the quantum level, physicists have developed a method for making an ion (electrically charged atom) display exact quantities of quantum-level motion -- any specific amount up to 100 packets of energy or 'quanta,' more than five times the previous record high of 17.

New mechanism moving droplets at record-high speed and long distance without extra power

Transporting droplets on solid surfaces at high speed and long distances without additional force, even against gravity, is a formidable task. But a research team comprising scientists from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) and three other universities and research institutes has recently devised a novel mechanism to transport droplets at record-high velocity and distance without extra energy input, and droplets can be moved upward along a vertical surface, which has never been achieved before.

Atomically precise models improve understanding of fuel cells

Simulations from researchers in Japan provide new insights into the reactions occurring in solid-oxide fuel cells by using realistic atomic-scale models of the electrode active site based on microscope observations instead of the simplified and idealized atomic structures employed in previous studies. This better understanding of how the structures in the cells affect the reactions could give clues on ways to improve performance and durability in future devices.

Toward molecular computers: First measurement of single-molecule heat transfer

Heat transfer through a single molecule has been measured for the first time by an international team of researchers.

New laws of attraction: Scientists print magnetic liquid droplets

Inventors of centuries past and scientists of today have found ingenious ways to make our lives better with magnets—from the magnetic needle on a compass to magnetic data storage devices and even MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) body scan machines.

Simulations fix the cracks in magnetic mirrors

When ring-shaped electromagnets are set up in linear arrangements, they can produce magnetic fields resembling a tube with a cone at each end—a structure that repels charged particles entering one cone back along their path of approach. Referred to as 'magnetic mirrors', these devices have been known to be a relatively easy way to confine plasma since the 1950s, but they have also proven to be inherently leaky.

Improving the signal-to-noise ratio in quantum chromodynamics simulations

Over the last few decades, the exponential increase in computer power and accompanying increase in the quality of algorithms has enabled theoretical and particle physicists to perform more complex and precise simulations of fundamental particles and their interactions. If you increase the number of lattice points in a simulation, it becomes harder to tell the difference between the observed result of the simulation and the surrounding noise.

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