Physics

New method predicts which black holes escape their galaxies

Shoot a rifle, and the recoil might knock you backward. Merge two black holes in a binary system, and the loss of momentum gives a similar recoil—a "kick"—to the merged black hole.

Physicists weigh in on the origin of heavy elements

A long-held mystery in the field of nuclear physics is why the universe is composed of the specific materials we see around us. In other words, why is it made of "this" stuff and not other stuff?

Weighing in on the origin of heavy elements

Nuclear physicists conducted a physics experiment that utilizes novel techniques to study the nature and origin of heavy elements in the universe.

Unlike Earth, Maybe Mars Didn’t Form With a Subsurface Magma Ocean

Researchers thought Mars formed — and potentially created a life-supporting atmosphere — like Earth did.

Tiny optical cavity could make quantum networks possible

Engineers have shown that atoms in optical cavities could be foundational to the creation of a quantum internet.

Skyrmion 'whirls' show promise for low-energy computer circuitry

UNSW material scientists have shed new light on a promising new way to store and process information in computers and electronic devices that could significantly cut down the energy required to maintain our digital lifestyles.

Energy-harvesting design aims to turn Wi-Fi signals into usable power

Any device that sends out a Wi-Fi signal also emits terahertz waves —electromagnetic waves with a frequency somewhere between microwaves and infrared light. These high-frequency radiation waves, known as "T-rays," are also produced by almost anything that registers a temperature, including our own bodies and the inanimate objects around us.

Double-walled nanotubes have electro-optical advantages

Theorists find that flexoelectric effects in double-walled carbon nanotubes could be highly useful for photovoltaic applications.

Quantum copycat: Researchers find a new way in which bosons behave like fermions

When a one-dimensional gas of strongly interacting bosons expands, the velocity distribution of the bosons transforms into one that is identical to non-interacting fermions.

Bubbles go with the flow: Simulating behavior of fluids moving through pipes

Researchers at the Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, used a sophisticated physical model to simulate the behavior of fluids moving through pipes. By including the possibility of shear-induced bubble formation, they find that, contrary to the assumptions of many previous works, fluids can experience significant slippage when in contact with fixed boundaries. This research may help reduce energy losses when pumping fluids, which is a significant concern in many industrial applications, such as gas and oil suppliers.

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